auditory nerve


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Related to auditory nerve: cochlea

auditory nerve

[′ȯd·ə‚tōr·ē ′nərv]
(neuroscience)
The eighth cranial nerve in vertebrates; either of a pair of sensory nerves composed of two sets of nerve fibers, the cochlear nerve and the vestibular nerve. Also known as acoustic nerve; vestibulocochlear nerve.
References in periodicals archive ?
AN is generally involved the bilateral auditory nerves.
Other research, such as that led by Charles Liberman, a professor of otology and lanyngology at Harvard Medical School, is looking into regenerating the damaged auditory nerve terminals, reestablishing the broken links to hair cells.
Dr Helmy Mulders, who led the research, said: "Studies in human tinnitus sufferers are still needed to confirm our results and to establish whether or not this approach will be effective for people who have had tinnitus for a long time, but our research shows that lowering the activity of the auditory nerve may be a promising approach to treating recently triggered tinnitus.
It can occur because of changes in the inner ear, auditory nerve, middle ear or outer ear.
But the effect is reversible and after three months, hearing has recovered and so has the sheath around the auditory nerve," researchers explained.
These effects seem to be due to both the broadening of activity in the cochlea in response to a spectrally restricted input, such as a pure tone, and the introduction of variability in the temporal patterns generated on the auditory nerve in response to a regular input, such as a low-frequency pure tone or a rapidly modulated broadband stimulus.
For those with severe hearing loss in both ears, however, cochlear implants could be an option, as they feed sounds directly to the auditory nerve.
In certain hearing loss, integral hair cells have mostly degenerated, but some neurons in the auditory nerve bundle are still functional.
The sounds are converted into electrical impulses and sent to the auditory nerve, which carries the signals to a person's brain where they are translated into recognizable sounds.
The device bypasses damaged or diseased parts of the ear by directly stimulating the auditory nerve, which is connected to the brain.
It converts sound from a small microphone into electric impulses that the auditory nerve reads as sound.
These may include hearing aids fitted to match the unique hearing loss of the child, or in cases of severe to profound hearing loss a cochlear implant that electrically stimulates the auditory nerve in response to sound.