auditory nerve


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Related to auditory nerve: cochlea

auditory nerve

[′ȯd·ə‚tōr·ē ′nərv]
(neuroscience)
The eighth cranial nerve in vertebrates; either of a pair of sensory nerves composed of two sets of nerve fibers, the cochlear nerve and the vestibular nerve. Also known as acoustic nerve; vestibulocochlear nerve.
References in periodicals archive ?
Direct stimulation of the auditory nerve is produced by currents delivered through electrodes placed in the scala tympani (ST), one of three fluid-filled chambers along the length of the cochlea.
Vestibular paroxysmia was first described as disabling positional vertigo that was already considered as "a controversial illness with a controversial treatment." The real entity providing a clear identification of what we are talking about, in place of a factitious terminology, is neurovascular compression of the auditory nerve. The frequency of a vascular loop in contact with the acousticofacial bundle and the numerous causes of vertigo disorders lead to a "thorny issue." How do we prove that the artery is offending the nerve and the cause of the unilateral vestibulocochlear symptoms of the patient?
The electrode is placed through the round window or via a cochleostomy into the inner ear, which can transmit electrical impulses directly to the auditory nerve (Azadpour, 2013; Stataloff & Lalwani, 2015).
While we once assumed that sensorineural hearing loss involved damage to those hair cells, recent studies show that up to 50% of the nerve connections between hair cells and the auditory nerve may be lost before detectable damage to hair cells occurs.
The mechanism of loudness recruitment is not yet clear, but it is common in general sensorineural deafness and considered an indication of cochlear hair cell diseases.8 All AN patients did not show loudness recruitment, indicating that the auditory nerve transmission pathway of AN was affected.
In humans, NF2 is a relatively rare inherited form of cancer caused by mutations in the anti-tumour gene NF2, which leads to benign tumours of the auditory nerve, Medical Xpress reported.
The potassium influx excites the hair cell, which in turn excites the nerve cell that enters the brain in the auditory nerve.
They create the perception of the sensation of sound by stimulating the auditory nerve using electrodes, which have a limited range of frequencies they can pick up.[2] My perception of sound is more of a low-resolution hologram than the real stuff.
But the first recordings of auditory nerve cells firing inside a spider brain suggest that the Phidippus audax jumping spider picks up airborne sounds from at least three meters away, says Ronald Hoy of Cornell University.
It is generated by synchronous firing of neurons along auditory nerve, cochlear nuclei, superior olivary nucleus, lateral lemniscus, and inferior colliculus.
Wave I is produced by the acoustic nerve activity that wave II can reflect the activity of the cochlear nucleus with a contribution from the auditory nerve, that Wave III can be referred to the generators in the superior olivary complex and the lateral leminiscii, that the wave IV-V complex is generated in the axons and/or nuclei of the lateral leminiscii and probably also from inferior colliculi.
They are then transmitted to the inner ear where tiny hairs in the cochlea (a snail-shaped organ) transform them into nerve impulses carried to the brain by the auditory nerve.