augur

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augur:

see omenomen,
sign or augury believed to foreshadow the future. Almost any occurrence can be interpreted as an omen. The typical omen was a natural phenomenon, such as a meteor, an eclipse, or the flight of birds.
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augur

(in ancient Rome) a religious official who observed and interpreted omens and signs to help guide the making of public decisions
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
With both eyes bandaged following an airplane crash during a wartime mission over Trieste, D'Annunzio wrote Notturno on several thousand thin strips of paper, a line or two on each, "the way the Sibyls used to write their brief auguries. ..." The result is straightforward recollection mixed with hallucinated prose poem, a militant Futurism articulated in what translator Stephen Sartarelli describes as an "often antiquated style." The book finds room to deify his mother, anatomize his painful convalescence, recall his boyhood and remembered landscapes, eulogize his daughter, and conjure dripping faucets, walks in the Venice fog, violets and violins.
The author discusses Arbus's portraits, street scenes, images of madness and disability, and her magazine work, including a spread of portraits of children in the magazine Harper's Bazaar, entitled "Auguries of Innocence." Other photographers, artists, and authors under discussion include Robert Frank, Truman Capote, Richard Avedon, Andy Warhol, Roland Barthes, and William Burroughs.
Auguries of Innocence showcases ceramics, painting, sculpture and photography by multi-talented Lynda Waggett.
The other odes in the Poems on the Underground series include exerpts from William Blake's Auguries of Innocence and Lord Alfred Tennyson's In Memoriam.
In Auguries of Innocence British poet William Blake set the bar for romantics when he wrote about seeing "...
The auguries after the first were not good following the most pedestrian account of the Barber of Seville Overture you could imagine.
The word 'inauguration' comes from Roman times, when priests interpreted signs from nature (auguries) to advise emperors and generals whether the auspices for their endeavours were good or bad.
auguries of steel blinded by their own reflections and circled
So far from exploring this idea, or the alternative possibility of a belief in a non-Christian godhead, Galvin quickly attempts (apparently by way of compliment) to put a more scientific slant on the reading of omens, by saying that "even the taking of auguries is less superstitious than one would imagine...," for it reveals a real understanding of the natural hazards of the environment (Gaivin 1972:53).
For example, the poet William Blake (1757-1827) opens "Auguries of Innocence" with these words:
only defense is my wit: not auguries, dreams, or the
If the product, selling efficiency and timing auguries line up, adjust your lists, geography and creative, and launch.