aureate


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

aureate

(of a style of writing or speaking) excessively elaborate or ornate; florid
References in periodicals archive ?
To learn to love Dunbar's aureate style we must cultivate an
35pm Aureate AINTREE PREDICTIONS: 6pm Singing Wizard 6.
The one who looks most interesting is Aureate, despite a disappointing effort when fancied over hurdles at Plumpton last time.
Reeves depicts Paulin as a poet arguing with himself; an earlier essay in the collection, by the same author, relates Seamus Heaney's self-argumentativeness and his fondness for mixing the aureate with the quotidian to the poet's exploration of Dante's relationship with Virgil.
He laces his wooing with aureate images, loading every rift with ore.
And those who husbanded the Golden Grain, And those who flung it to the Winds like Rain, Alike to no such aureate Earth are turn'd As, buried once, Men want dug up again.
Here we have the full aureate panoply of Wolfe with the stops pulled out--inflation, apostrophe, doubling and tripling of modifiers, synaesthesia, rhetorical questions, paradox, extended formulaic repetition, anaphoristic paralleling in long sequences of clauses and sentences, etc.
Aureate set a fiendish gallop but came back to the field with two furlongs to run, while McEvoy was biding his time in behind waiting for the gaps to arrive.
Moreover, the style of the language, when it is aureate, exalted, opulent, or self-consciously mannered, draws attention to itself with such force that we are made more conscious of the qualities of the language than we are of the characters speaking it.
Showalter's "personal take" is alive with her personality and aureate prose, and in her conclusion she contemplates "the current bitterness of academic fiction" and the "pettiness, intransigence and unkindness" of English department members--which will ring true for many readers (124).
The cypress, your keeper of gates, calls to mind, In an aureate dream how once Troy grew Strong, as Troy lay devoured by flames, ruined.
metallic Hudson, and in the turning aureate afternoon,