auroral oval

auroral oval

[ə′rȯr·əl ′ō·vəl]
(geophysics)
An oval-shaped region centered on the earth's magnetic pole in which auroral emissions occur.
References in periodicals archive ?
And while other Alaska sites advertise themselves as Northern Lights locations, the aurora is especially impressive in Fairbanks and all the way north to Wiseman, as these cities sit under the Auroral Oval: a ring-shaped region that encompasses Fairbanks on the southern end and Wiseman to the north.
The part of the northern hemisphere where the northern lights are most visible is known as the 'auroral oval', which extends over northern Scandinavia, Alaska, Siberia and the whole of Canada.
'We are above the main obstacle, cloud cover, and also have a much wider overall view of the Auroral Oval from around 36000ft above sea level, than you do at ground level.'
We will use these to compare the auroral oval's size with direct measurements of Earth's magnetism (surface field strength and position of the geomagnetic pole) made since the early 19th century.
Sometimes we receive an extra large flare from the Sun which causes the auroral oval to expand and reach further south to much lower latitudes.
Lawrence River and learn about the story of aNew Francea, as well as the origins of the cityas most famous landmarks - Take a trip to Montmorency Falls (which are higher than Niagara Falls) and walk the width of the falls on a suspension bridge The Northern Lights Did you know that much of Canada lies under the auroral oval? This means there are lots of opportunities for travellers to Canada to view one of the Earthas most stunning natural displays: the Northern Lights.
This has the effect of allowing the vertical component of the interplanetary magnetic field (Bz) to connect with the magnetic field of the Earth more frequently, when charged particles from the solar wind can spiral down the field lines towards the polar regions and the auroral oval.
The northern auroral oval is slightly smaller and more intense than the southern one, implying that Saturn's magnetic field is not equally distributed across the planet; it is slightly uneven and stronger in the north than the south.
The necklace lights we see around the earth's magnetic poles are caused by this increase of atomic particles charging Earth's magnetic field and creating an auroral oval of high-altitude gases.
some times, we receive an extra-large flare from the Sun, which causes the auroral oval to expand and reach out further south to much lower latitudes.