auroral oval

auroral oval

[ə′rȯr·əl ′ō·vəl]
(geophysics)
An oval-shaped region centered on the earth's magnetic pole in which auroral emissions occur.
References in periodicals archive ?
some times, we receive an extra-large flare from the Sun, which causes the auroral oval to expand and reach out further south to much lower latitudes.
You need clear, dark skies and to travel to a spot under the auroral oval such as Northern Sweden.
And because Fairbanks sits in an auroral oval, we also have fantastic Northern lights viewing--in fact, our hotels even offer Northern Lights' wake-up calls.
This has the effect of allowing the vertical component of the interplanetary magnetic field (Bz) to connect with the magnetic field of the Earth more frequently, when charged particles from the solar wind can spiral down the field lines towards the polar regions and the auroral oval.
The northern auroral oval is slightly smaller and more intense than the southern one, implying that Saturn's magnetic field is not equally distributed across the planet; it is slightly uneven and stronger in the north than the south.
In the northern hemisphere the auroral oval bulges further south, the stronger the solar wind.
Sometimes we receive an extra-large flare from the Sun which causes the auroral oval to expand and reach out further south to much lower latitudes.
There is a phenomenon called the auroral oval, which is essentially a halo that goes around the globe at a latitude north of the Arctic Circle--that is where the auroral activity is concentrated.
Sometimes we receive an extra large flare from the Sun, which causes the auroral oval to expand and reach further south to much lower latitudes.
He credits this with Fairbanks' location within the auroral oval (a ring-shaped region around the North Pole where auroras are most often visible).
The best viewing areas in the world fall within range of the auroral oval.
Within auroral ovals, some 100 to 1,000 km (62 to 620 mi) over our heads, high-energy electrons from solar plasma collide with air molecules in Earth's upper atmosphere.