auroral zone

auroral zone

[ə′rȯr·əl ‚zōn]
(geophysics)
A roughly circular band around either geomagnetic pole within which there is a maximum of auroral activity; lies about 10-15° geomagnetic latitude from the geomagnetic poles.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The precipitating electrons that cause the green picket fence are thus aurora, though this occurs outside the auroral zone, so it's indeed unique."
This wasn't the only light show NASA created as the space agency also made an amazing light show with chemical compounds that were ejected by the Auroral Zone Upwelling Rocket Experiment (AZURE).
Ian Griffin, director of the Otago Museum in New Zealand, shared snippets of his experience on Twitter saying, 'Nice trip through the southern auroral zone tonight on Flight To the Lights.
The images revealed that "there are different kinds of irregularities in the auroral zone compared to the polar cap," according to coauthor Anthony Mannucci, such that "the effects on radio signals will be different in these two locations." Specifically, the disturbances in the auroral region were larger in scale (about 1-40 kilometers in diameter) than those over the Arctic polar cap (about 1-8 kilometers in diameter).
Geomagnetically he is closer to the auroral zone than the United Kingdom and is much better placed to ob serve this phenomenon.
Satellites and ground-based radars reveal that there is a surprising outflow of ionized oxygen atoms from the auroral zone into space.
They believe this radiation is closely related to the soft radiation previously detected during rocket flights in the auroral zone....
During the environmental study early in the progress of the HAARP project, Gakona, Alaska, was identified as a DOD-owned location within the Arctic auroral zone. The Gakona site had been planned by the USAF to be an Over the Horizon Backscatter (OTH-H) radar installation.
For the Northern Hemisphere, the aurora should be visible mainly in North America, since the sun is illuminating most of the auroral zone in Russia and Scandinavia.
Three bright areas dominate the dayside auroral zone (left map), the view of Uranus facing the sun as Voyager 2 swung past the rotating planet.
Those interested in aurorae and related phenomena should access the American website www.spaceweather.com for up to the minute information, and a gallery of exquisite photographs from the Auroral Zone. And if it looks promising, find a clear northern outlook and hope for the best.