autarchy

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Related to autarchic: autarkical

autarchy

1. unlimited rule; autocracy
2. self-government; self-rule
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

autarchy

  1. absolute sovereignty or despotic rule.
  2. see AUTARKY.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
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Diverse stakeholders in decision-making should be involved with the purpose of supporting more significant power distribution at the company level, thus diminishing the autarchic power of management and providing employees with superior command regarding decisions which concern them.
It indicates the contrast between the autarchic Chinese civilization that survived, despite internal ebbs and flows, for several millennia, until starting to succumb during the 19th century to foreigners, imposed by force, culminating in the importation of the Marxist ideology, and its fanatical destruction of Chinese tradition epitomized by the Cultural Revolution.
"Historically, IIM-A has been a very well regarded institution with high quality, but it has functioned in an autarchic environment.
The other extreme is a world comprising entirely isolated autarchic states, where individuals are protected from external economic forces and the state has full autonomy over domestic affairs.
CONICET is an autarchic body under the Ministry of Science and Technology, which is considered the leading institution in the promotion of science and technology in Argentina.
96) And the explanation that the two authors give is that risk, as a fundamental component of a capital market, is not present in China's bond markets because bonds are traded within an autarchic market with investors controlled mainly by the state.
materials, recipes provided instructions for autarchic cookery.
These ideas are represented by "an utter unscrupulous and amoral artist-god who frees (lost) himself from the dire pressure of fullness and over-fullness" and who "wishes to become conscious of his autarchic power and constant delight and desire, whether he is building or destroying whether acting benignly or malevolently" (90) in order to become an extension of the eternal change through the affirmation of Dionysian suffering and pessimism.
(1927: 24) Between the end of the 1920s and the beginning of the 1930s, however, the Futurists changed their point of view not only on jazz, but in general on foreign culture: they partly adhered to Mussolini's proclamations, inspired by his autarchic and nationalistic views.