autarchy


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autarchy

1. unlimited rule; autocracy
2. self-government; self-rule

autarchy

  1. absolute sovereignty or despotic rule.
  2. see AUTARKY.
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Postdramatic analysis panel Indicator Component Category 1 Time Absence of chronological or linear times Temporal fragmentation of characters, architectures Kairos or present time Disregard or controversy over the concept of "reality" Plot change to conditional or to Future possibilities 2 Theme and text Textual autarchy (the predominance of the text is denied) Visuality and multidisciplinarity of the show besides the text.
If we give an example based on the passive situation in the "desire for care versus autarchy" conflict, the patient is excessively dependent on the other and the need for protection and maintenance is the forefront in the passive state.
The problem identified by this research was what the contributions of distance management training are expressed by the managers of the autarchy around their competences required for the performance of their duties.
Gregor asserts that autarchy as a substitution for primitive accumulation also occurred in Russia under both Lenin and Stalin, but, thanks to the Bolsheviks' abolishment of private property, this austere policy had much more drastic consequences for the Russian population than the Italian one.
Goodsell's scientific illustrations and their use in molecular biology between public model and trace; giving a theory a material body; staining techniques and the "autarchy of the nucleus" since 1876; liquid or globular: on the history of Gestalt-seeing in life sciences of the early 19th century; and reducing complexity or essentialism: medical knowledge and "reading traces" in the history of art.
Recognizing the autonomy of law means to recognize that any legal issue can be solved with elements from within the discipline (otherwise law could not be considered a science); it is not about an "intellectual autarchy", but the possibility to solve, in law only, any matter (Steinhardt, 2000: 46-47).
But this small world was not completely autarchy. Regarding specific goods items, there emerged remote distribution networks that could connect Kyoto and local districts directly and local distribution networks connecting directly between remote places not via Kyoto.
This only increased the gravitation of the Russian economy and society toward politics of autarchy, strengthened the army and military-industrial complex in an atmosphere of promotion of the idea of a "besieged fort" before the person of the hostile position of the West and glorification of the patriotic service to the state.
[B]y affording its visitor a whole panoply of pleasures, from technological wonder to haute cuisine, including the panorama, the Tower ultimately reunites with the essential function of all major human sites: autarchy. The Tower can live on itself: one can dream there, eat there, observe there, understand there, marvel there, shop there; as on an ocean liner (another mythic object that sets children dreaming), one can feel oneself cut off from the world and yet the owner of a world.
They tried to explain it through two main dynamics, more often interlinked: the specificity of Oseni's transnational migration (2), or the supposed cultural autarchy, which would have preserved and transformed some archaic competitive practices up to the present (3).
The object of investigation consists of the mechanisms of management of the execution of administrative contracts by the following agencies/organizations of the Brazilian Federal Public Administration (FPA), which are respectively a public corporation, an autarchy and a public corporation: