auteur

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auteur

(ōtör`), in film criticism, a director who so dominates the film-making process that it is appropriate to call the director the auteur, or author, of the motion picture. The auteur theory holds that the director is the primary person responsible for the creation of a motion picture and imbues it with his or her distinctive, recognizable style. Propounded most notably by the French director and film critic François TruffautTruffaut, François
, 1932–84, French film director and critic. Known in his early 20s as a writer for the influential French film journal Cahiers du Cinéma,
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 and the American film critic Andrew Sarris, it has been attacked by others, including Pauline KaelKael, Pauline
, 1919–2001, American film critic, b. Petaluma, Calif. Possessed of extremely strong opinions about movies and a feisty, pop-inflected style, Kael was noted for her provocative, passionate, and tough-minded film criticism.
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.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As a moviegoer, he came of age when American auteurism was at its height.
Although his own films have his indelible stamp, Chereau insists he is not an advocate of auteurism. "I consider myself the auteur of my films," he says, "but the notion of 'auteur' is very dangerous.
Most events are still programmed either by vets who grew up during the birth of auteurism in the late '50s, or by a subsequent generation that embraced it, for political or cultural reasons, as an accepted mantra.
Upon winning one of his two awards, Payne said, "It's not about sources of financing, it's about spirit and personal artistic expression -- auteurism." Continuing the theme of defining what makes indie pics different from studio films, Quentin Tarantino, who presented an award with Harvey Keitel, asked the camera operators filming the event to turn their cameras onto the audience.
Pretentious is hardly the word for Laetitia Masson's third feature, "Love Me," the kind of juvenile, self-indulgent Gallic tripe that gives auteurism a bad name.