autochory

autochory

[′ȯd·ō‚kȯr·ē]
(ecology)
Active self-dispersal of individuals or their disseminules.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dispersal syndromes: Anemochory occurred in 32 (58.2 %) species overall, followed by autochory in 17 species (30.9 %), and zoochory in six species (10.9 %).
According to Granville (1971), autochory allows for a maximum dispersal distance of five to seven meters and is related to variations in the osmotic pressure within mesocarp cells.
Autochory is dispersal by the plant itself, using no outside forces in moving the diaspore.
(FV) life form: (A) tree, (L) climbers and (H) herbaceous; (CS) successional category: (P) pioneer, (Si) early secondary, (St) late secondary and (C) climax; (SD) dispersion syndrome: (Ane) anemochory, (Aut) autochory, (Zoo) zoochory and (SC) unrated.
Parameters Sector A ** Sector B *** Richness (S) 64 54 Shannon's diversity (H') 3.39 3.20 Basal area ([m.sup.2] x [ha.sup.-1]) 23.32 34.43 Individuals (ind x [ha.sup.-1]) 1,542 2,672 Anemochory (%) 41 23 Autochory (%) 13 15 Zoochory (%) 46 62 Deciduousness (%) 58 39 Evergreen trees (%) 42 61 Parameters T P Richness (S) 1.03 0.32 Shannon's diversity (H') 2.06 < 0.05 Basal area ([m.sup.2] x [ha.sup.-1]) 2.53 < 0.05 Individuals (ind x [ha.sup.-1]) 6.82 < 0.05 Anemochory (%) 4.18 < 0.05 Autochory (%) 0.26 0.79 Zoochory (%) 2.84 < 0.05 Deciduousness (%) 2.66 < 0.05 Evergreen trees (%) 2.65 < 0.05 T = value of Student's t-test; P = probability value of Student's t-test.
In arid and semi-arid regions, the abiotic syndromes (anemochory and autochory) grow in importance, as several studies carried out on the caatinga have demonstrated (MACHADO et al., 1997; GRIZ; MACHADO, 2001; BARBOSA et al., 2002, 2003).
Hence, species with different structures form different dispersal syndromes, including anemochory [10-12], zoochory [13-23], autochory [24, 25], ombrohydrochory [7,25], and barochory [26].
Angiosperms have evolved a multitude of external dispersal adaptations, including wind (anemochory), water (hydrochory), animal (zoochory), and self-dispersal (autochory; Fenner, 1985).
The species present in the upper stratum (A) and regenerative (R) environments I (AT I), II (AT II) and III (AT III) respectively, are accompanied by family, scientific name, type of dispersal (SD): Anemo = anemocoric, Auto = autochory, Zoo = zoochoric; and environmental group (EG): Pioneer (P), climax light demanding (CL) and shade-tolerant (CS).
The analysis of dispersal syndromes was out of the scope of this study; hence the fruits were classified only according to the presence of fleshy edible parts, instead of dispersal features (zoochory, autochory, and anemochory).
Considering the species with determined syndromes (123), the zoochory predominated in all habits, corresponding to 69%, followed by autochory with 20% and anemochory with 11% (Figure 2).