autochthonous

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Related to autochthonic: two-fold, scrutinised

autochthonous

[ȯ′täk·thə·nas]
(ecology)
Pertaining to organisms or organic sediments that are indigenous to a given ecosystem.
(geology)
Having been formed or occurring in the place where found.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Ike's snake barely has time to be a snake before becoming an anthology, I would emphasize that, in its partial and autochthonic arousal, it remains "concordant with the wilderness it crawled," a thing of the earth, or, more accurately, of that piece of earth which more than any other in the big woods (with the exception of the notional "funnelling tip" [253] for which it stands as synecdoche) is land whose meaning materializes for Ike through his repudiation of plantocratic property, and of the neoplantation that it will become (via de Spain's sale of the woods themselves).
[Inasmuch as the primordial image is a constant autochthonic psychological factor repeating itself in all times and places, we might also, in a certain sense, say the same of the Idea, although this is, on account of its rational nature, much more subject to modification by rational elaboration (in turn strongly influenced by time and circumstance), which gives it formulations corresponding with the spirit of the time.
Japan's victory over Russia in 1905 made her a great power, and led to a search for autochthonic reasons to explain Japan's military achievements.
While there Tony had befriended Baraiye as a potentially influential elder of the only autochthonic Kamula sub-clan.
Long Live Man (1962), Selected Poems (1962), The Mutation of the Spirit (1964), Elegiac Feelings American (1970), Herald of the Autochthonic Spirit (1981), Mindfield (1989), and other books of poetry followed.
For it signifies the venerable pedigree as well as the specific theme of autochthonic tales such as the one Socrates contrives in the present passage.
Later works include Earth Egg (1974) and Herald of the Autochthonic Spirit (1981).
This is what is driving both 'autochthonic political projects of belonging'--defensive formations seeking to protect their local territory--and the movements of activist citizens that are often adrift from any national polity.