autochthon

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autochthon

[ȯ′täk·thən]
(geology)
A succession of rock beds that have been moved comparatively little from their original site of formation, although they may be folded and faulted extensively.
(paleontology)
A fossil occurring where the organism once lived.
References in periodicals archive ?
Verification of data using the techniques of calculating the [chi square]-criterion and contingency coefficient K allows to select the main meaning dominants, categorial units of the basis of its concept system from the set of fixed allochthons--conceptual variables presenting atypical knowledge quanta, regular autochthons of LPD and SPD concept system--by determining the correspondences between the frequency distributions of concept actualizers of a certain domain in the LPD and SPD texts and specific concepts in statistically significant domains.
If the population has grown sufficiently, the headquarters of a customary chiefdom, a hamlet of autochthons or a hamlet of migrants under customary trusteeship can become administratively autonomous.
To a certain extent, it cannot be denied that they indirectly help small migrants obtain access to land but, of course, they enrich themselves at the same time and threaten the very existence of the autochthons. Some of these officials and brokers are not typical or the easiest villains to identify, but they do represent a structural component in the insidious intrusion of capitalism.
Relative success also created economic envy and rivalry between them and with other autochthon tribes, which reinforced ethnic tensions, as did the divide-and-rule policies of the Mobutu regime.
Fix up the atmosphere, improve cultural opportunities for my autochthons, you know.
[Post-coloniality:] Thus, while outside an entire society partitions itself into the duality of the vanquished and the victorious, the autochthons and the invaders, in the harem, reduced to a shack or a cave, the dialogue has become almost definitively blocked.
In recent years, African countries from Cote d'Ivoire to Liberia, Kenya, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Cameroon have seen a resurgence in the salience of ethnic identities that distinguish populations between autochthons ('sons or daughters of the soil') and allochthons (aliens or strangers).
What is relevant here is that the same human impulse to make sense of the world and to transform it for better human habitation is also in place in the Yoruba worldview: "A peep at the historical narratives suggests how Obatala, as leader of the autochthons emerges as the back of which Orunmila, the master of divination and prophecy, the keeper of the old gnosis, is the front.
Described by island autochthons as the god of things living, K.
(The 'lower' chiefdom is thereby full of exiles not just autochthons!) After nearly two years in the field, a group of men from this clan led me a couple of miles into the rain forest to see a set of legendary earth works which they said belonged to the veli, the real, tiny ancestors of the Serean chiefs.
Such pressures spotlight already hypervisible whites, and may see populist, autochthonous movements in Africa portray, and sometimes exclude, white settler communities as supposed 'strangers' or 'fake' autochthons.
As Michael Scott (2001) has argued for Arosi in Makira in the southeastern Solomons, land mediates relations of identity and difference between autochthons and outsiders.