autochthonous

(redirected from autochthony)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

autochthonous

[ȯ′täk·thə·nas]
(ecology)
Pertaining to organisms or organic sediments that are indigenous to a given ecosystem.
(geology)
Having been formed or occurring in the place where found.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a controversial statement, Casamiquela argued that if indigenous peoples of Patagonia "define themselves as Mapuche, they are Chilean, and if they are Chilean, they have no right to land in Argentina." (36) Thus, in addition to fighting for formal recognition from the Argentine government, many groups have also been charged with the perhaps impossible task of verifying their own autochthony. These difficulties also echo one of the characteristic traits of manifest destiny in the United States: the imposition of a "civilized" order on a seemingly chaotic prehistoric system, with the result that concepts such as rights and property are (re)applied to benefit the recently arrived settlers.
Here, again, we see a contrary or doubled outlook, to invoke Bakhtin, on the relationship between autochthony and importation.
His published books include African Guerrillas: Raging Against the Machine and The Politics of Origin in Africa: Autochthony, Citizenship and Conflict.
it has a double-sided relationship with tourist consumption: bom of a desire to affirm a resistance offered by 'autochthony' confronted with mass tourism, it has ended up proposing another way of encountering the area, or rather the hinterland, invisible to the major waves of tourists converging on the coast, and therefore guaranteed to be 'authentic.'" (Ciarcia, 2006) This sort of example is very indicative of the reinvented, and often outmoded, identity constructions of these last years, ranging from the spaces of parks and eco-museums to the framework provided by various "project territories" linked to country contracts.
This conception of otherness, based on the anteriority of migrations and the negation of autochthony, justifies the domination of a small group: the first European immigrants supported by the "Creoles," who have an ambiguous status, both "other" and founders of this society.
Nira Yuval-Davis, "Citizenship, Autochthony, and the Question of Forced Migration" [53-65]
Nonetheless, they open the desert to technology and to the outside world, and the Bedouin protagonists strive to keep their autochthony without being xenophobic.
The Labdacid myth and the resulting familial pollution are additionally intermingled with the motif of the internal pollution of Thebes, ever since the city's mythical foundation (the Theban autochthony legend).
In the African context, scholars have argue that a link can be drawn from exclusionary state policies based on notions of autochthony and belonging, and the new global circuits of power that have opened up in the past decades.
It is Geschiere who has suggested the term 'autochthony' for this phenomenon (from the Greek--being of the soil), a word which is already in use in the Netherlands and in the Francophone world to make the crucial difference between the 'autochthones' who belong and the 'allochthones' who do not.
The first two, located alongside each other in the Acropolis, are seen to offer two different approaches to identity in ancient Greece, and to the symbolic expression of myth, with the Parthenon celebrating superiority over the Greek cities based on democracy and empire, while the Erechteion expresses ancestral superiority founded on autochthony. In the former, myth "solidified into permanent stasis," and its regular, formal features served to "distance democracy from the space of daily action, spiritualize its message and give it universal significance," while the Erechteion's informality served to "secularize tradition and raise it to the level of everyday life" (40).
Previous taphonomic analysis on the studied foraminiferal assemblages indicates their autochthony to para-autochthony, and the scarcity of potentially allochthonous specimens (Reolid, 2008), that is crucial for supporting the interpretations focused on the composition of foraminiferal assemblages.