autogiro

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autogiro

(ôtōjī`rō) or

gyroplane

(jī`rəplān), type of aircraft supported in the air by a horizontally mounted airfoil similar to that of a helicopter but unpowered. Invented by the Spaniard Juan de la Cierva, it was first flown successfully in Jan., 1923, in Spain. Most of the lift is supplied by large airfoils which are mounted horizontally above the craft and rotated by the airflow created by the craft's forward movement. The autogiro has fixed wings that are smaller than those of an ordinary airplane; the body and tail assembly is of conventional design. Thrust is supplied by an ordinary engine and propeller, and control is maintained by a rudder, elevators, and ailerons. In one type, fixed wings are absent, and the rotor provides all the lift. Control of pitch and roll are accomplished by tilting the rotor forward, backward, or to either side. Some advantages of the machine are that its descent will be slowed by the turning of the rotor if the engine fails; that it becomes airborne with a very short takeoff run and can land in small areas; and that with a moderate headwind it can virtually hover with zero ground speed. However, it cannot match the vertical climbing performance of the helicopter.

autogiro

[‚ȯd·ō′jī·rō]
(aerospace engineering)
A type of aircraft which utilizes a rotating wing (rotor) to provide lift and a conventional engine-propeller combination to propel the vehicle through the air.

autogiro

, autogyro
a self-propelled aircraft supported in flight mainly by unpowered rotating horizontal blades
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Speich, aged 45, who has 10 years flying experience was taking part in engineering flight development tests on the machine - the first autogiro to be given the green light to use UK airspace.
Mr Speich's autogiro was built in Germany and will be in use in the UK following further tests.
Pitcairn poured a great deal of his Pittsburgh Plate Glass fortune into developing an autogiro in the United States and perfected the technique of direct control by tilting the rotor blades.
Cierva called his creation an "autogiro," and in the course of refining the design, discovered a fatal flaw--the machine rolled uncontrollably once it left the ground.
By early 1923, Cierva's autogiro had successfully navigated a closed course at a height of 100 feet.
The Kellett Autogiro KD-1 had a maximum airspeed of 125 miles per hour and a range of 200 miles.