response

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Related to autoimmune response: Autoimmune disorders

response

1. Bridge a bid replying to a partner's bid or double
2. Christianity a short sentence or phrase recited or sung by the choir or congregation in reply to the officiant at a church service
3. Electronics the ratio of the output to the input level, at a particular frequency, of a transmission line or electrical device
4. any pattern of glandular, muscular, or electrical reactions that arises from stimulation of the nervous system

response

[ri′späns]
(communications)
(control systems)
A quantitative expression of the output of a device or system as a function of the input. Also known as system response.
(statistics)
The value of some measurable quantity after a treatment has been applied.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the gut microbe Enterococcus gallinarum leaks out of the intestines and sets up camp in other organs such as the liver, it appears to trigger an autoimmune response similar to what's seen in lupus, a new study in mice reveals.
The conditions "may be linked through a common autoimmune response from exposed intracellular or altered cell surface antigens on damaged melanocytes," the investigators said.
Thus, they suggest that at least k chains can be considered a very sensitive circulating biomarker of B cell activation and humoral autoimmune response. This may represent a preliminary important study for a more detailed multicenter analysis.
"We are now in a position to precisely define the viral factors responsible for the induction of the autoimmune response."
Therefore, an alteration in the balance of these subgroups can trigger an autoimmune response (9).
The etiology of PUK has not been completely ascertained, but consensus has centered on an autoimmune response to a localized antigen.
Certain triggers, such as oxidative stress or physical trauma, expose antigens and lead to an autoimmune response [7].
People with celiac disease have higher than normal levels of certain autoantibodies that trigger the autoimmune response (Brown, 2013).
This could be due to increased permeability of the intestine, raising the level of antigen exposure, resulting in increased risk of an autoimmune response to brain components or it may be that gluten proteins are broken down into psychoactive peptides.
When the body's inflammatory response is functioning normally, it protects and repairs tissue; when stress on the joints or an autoimmune response causes inflammation, it functions in an out-of-control manner that can harm more than it heals.
You experience an autoimmune response, in which your immune system attacks the undigested gluten proteins, and the lining of your small intestine becomes inflamed and damaged.
If this barrier function is weakened, the adaptive immune processes initiated in the gut may be released into the systemic system, triggering an allergic or autoimmune response and symptoms in the host (McCance, Huether, Brashers, & Rote, 2010).

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