autoinfection


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to autoinfection: hyperinfection, retroinfection

autoinfection

[¦ȯd·ō‚in′fek·shən]
(medicine)
Reinfection by an organism existing within the body or transferred from one part of the body to another.
References in periodicals archive ?
Autoinfection in immunocompetent hosts is an infrequent, clinically unimportant event, but in immunocompromised it can lead to a life-threatening illness due to hyperinfection or disseminated syndrome with large numbers of larvae affecting various organs.
stercoralis hyperinfection is considered to be an enhanced form of autoinfection and is typically, but not always, a result of changes in the immune status [21].
Strongyloides infection, in contrast, can lead to autoinfection in which rhabditiform larvae can re-penetrate the gastrointestinal mucosa or the perianal skin.
(3-5) Immunosuppression can lead to accelerated autoinfection and a large burden of migrating larvae in the body.
These larvae are either passed in the stool or later mature into the infective filariform larva that are capable of re-invading the same host's skin or mucosa, thus restarting the parasitic cycle in a process termed autoinfection. Such autoinfection can lead to widespread dissemination of the infection.
Within the intestine, it may penetrate the bowel wall, leading to an autoinfection state.
The plausible explanation for higher infestation might be because of exceptional development pathway called autoinfection in most of the helminths, which causes an increase in the number of adult worms inside the intestine.
Transmission typically occurs when larvae from stool-contaminated soil penetrate skin; intraintestinal autoinfection is also possible, sometimes allowing infection to persist for decades.
Strongyloides stercoralis can cause eosinophilia years after the initial infection because the organism is capable of autoinfection inside its host.
Moreover, the act of autoinfection allows it to infect the same host over and over with any intermediate host.
Strongyloides stercoralis is also capable of causing autoinfection in the host.
stercoralis has the unique feature of transmitting from the parasitic form to the infective stage within the body, rather than emerging and forming free-living stages, causing autoinfection. (17) This may lead to latent infection for an indefinite period in an immunocompetent host, but may also cause fatal hyper-disseminated infection organ transplant recipients, cancer and other immunosuppressive condition.