autolysosome


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autolysosome

[¦ȯd·ō′lī·sə‚sōm]
(cell and molecular biology)
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Additionally, MSCs promote autophagosome and autolysosome formation and thereby protect the islet cells [141].
However, p62/ SQDTM, a chaperone that shuttles intracellular protein aggregates into autophagosomes for degradation, has emerged as a useful marker of autophagic status since the entire p62/SQDTM1 protein aggregated complex is degraded after engulfment by the autolysosome. p62/ SQDTM1 level is inversely correlated with autophagic flux [27].
Impaired autolysosome formation correlates with Lamp-2 depletion: Role of apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis in pancreatitis.
In the end, cargo degradation is dependent on the interplay between lysosomes and autophagosomes, the so-called autolysosome. One key participant in the transport of autophagic vacuoles is FYCO1 protein [46-47].
Interestingly, in aged Nrf2 KO mice, intermediate structures of autophagy, such as the autophagosome and autolysosome, were accumulated in RPE and Bruch's membrane.
Pugsley, "Quantifying autophagy: Measuring LC3 puncta and autolysosome formation in cells using multispectral imaging flow cytometry," Methods, vol.
Autolysosome, referred to as late/degradative autophagic vacuoles and autolysosomes (AVd), had higher electron density than the cytoplasm as shown in Figure 1(a).
Autophagy is a dynamic process in which damaged organelles and long-lived proteins are delivered to the lysosome for degradation and recycling.[7] During this dynamic process, a double-membrane vesicle called autophagosome fuses with lysosomal to form an autolysosome. Light chain 3 type II (LC3II) and p62 are two major proteins in autophagy.
Fusion of the autophagosome with a lysosome to form the autolysosome is a prerequisite for complete degradation of cargo content, which ensures proper disposal of damaged cellular biomolecules or organelles.
The autophagosome is then fused with a lysosome, whereupon an autolysosome is formed.
Examination with TEM showed these inclusions to be a continuum of phagolysosome profiles (which we have termed accumulation bodies) - from phagolysosomes containing possible autolysosome and other dinoflagellate debris, to those filled with densely flocculent material, to residual bodies containing haphazardly arranged, laminated, dense bundles of fibers with both loose and condensed appearances [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURES 4B and 4C OMITTED].