autosomal recessive hearing loss

autosomal recessive hearing loss

[‚ȯd·ə¦sōm·əl ri¦ses·iv ′hēr·iŋ ‚lȯs]
(medicine)
Typically, a congenital, severe loss of hearing (up to and including complete deafness) that occurs only if an individual inherits a mutant copy of an autosomal recessive hearing loss gene from each parent.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, some other genes may occur as either non-syndromic or syndromic, such as SLC26A4, which is responsible of a non-syndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss (DFNB4), the second most frequently found after GJB2 [48].
In the present study, it was shown that the cause of hearing loss was GJB2 mutations in seven of 21 families with non-syndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss (Table 1).
Caption: Figure 1: (a) Pedigree of the family with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss. Darkened symbols denote affected individuals.
"Connexin 26 mutations in nonsyndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss: Speech and hearing rehabilitation," Curr.
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