autotroph


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autotroph

(ôt`ətrōf'), in biology, an organism capable of synthesizing its own organic substances from inorganic compounds. Autotrophs produce their own sugars, lipids, and amino acids using carbon dioxide as a source of carbon, and ammonia or nitrates as a source of nitrogen. Organisms that use light for the energy to synthesize organic compounds are called photosynthetic autotrophs; organisms that oxidize such compounds as hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to obtain energy are called chemosynthetic autotrophs, or chemotrophs. Photosynthetic autotrophs include the green plants, certain algae, and the pigmented sulfur bacteria (see photosynthesisphotosynthesis
, process in which green plants, algae, and cyanobacteria utilize the energy of sunlight to manufacture carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water in the presence of chlorophyll. Some of the plants that lack chlorophyll, e.g.
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). Chemotrophs include the iron bacteria, the nitrifying bacteria, and the nonpigmented sulfur bacteria (see chemosynthesischemosynthesis,
process in which carbohydrates are manufactured from carbon dioxide and water using chemical nutrients as the energy source, rather than the sunlight used for energy in photosynthesis. Much life on earth is fueled directly or indirectly by sunlight.
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). Heterotrophsheterotroph
, living organism that obtains its energy from carbohydrates and other organic material. All animals and most bacteria and fungi are heterotrophic. In contrast, autotrophs are organisms that use inorganic substances as energy sources and carbon dioxide as a carbon source.
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 are organisms that must obtain their energy from organic compounds.
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autotroph

[′ȯd·ō‚träf]
(biology)
An organism capable of synthesizing organic nutrients directly from simple inorganic substances, such as carbon dioxide and inorganic nitrogen.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
For animals metabolic rate scales with body size as a 3/4 power law (e.g., Brown et al, 2004), and therefore, larger consumer species have substantially larger energetic requirements (the scaling of metabolic rate to body size is different for autotrophs, as well as microbes and protists; see Pretzsch and Dieler 2012 and DeLong et al.
Autotrophs, as you probably know, were among the first species of life on this planet and created their own food through photosynthesis, using sunlight to turn carbon dioxide and water into useful organic compounds such as sugars.
After I grow a batch of a particular autotroph, I filter out the ceils and am left with the organic carbon they produced and released.
Estimating the role of autotrophs in nonpoint source phosphorus retention in a Laurentian Great Lakes coastal Wetland.
Autotrophs, unlike animals, do not depend upon amino acids and organic molecules from their environment.
This indicates whether an autotroph or a heterotroph made the lipid.
Figure 1 shows the pathways for a reductive autotroph in which the five starting points generated in the reductive TCA cycle lead stepwise to the canonical 20 amino acids and 4 ribonucleotides.
Autotroph elemental composition appears to be regulated by similar physiological processes in algae and terrestrial plants (Agren 1988).
For all the relevant organisms examined, a comparative analysis revealed a consensus in the linear progression of compounds by stepwise synthesis for each type of monomer; this consensus enabled us to construct a minimal metabolic chart for an autotroph (see Supplemental Figure 1 at http://www.biolbull.org/supplemental/).
- The core ecosystem consisted of a single species of autotroph (the green, unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) and bacterial decomposers consisting of three known species (see media preparation above).
The importance of autotroph distribution to mussel growth in a well-mixed, temperate estuary.
If the mixotroph has a higher affinity than the autotroph for mineral nutrients, the autotroph cannot compete in the system; more interesting, therefore, is the situation where mixotrophs are assumed to have the lowest affinity for mineral nutrients: