auxesis

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auxesis

[‚ȯg′zē·səs]
(physiology)
Growth resulting from increase in cell size.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evans, "Quantitative analysis of the microscale of auxetic foams," Physica Status Solidi (B) Basic Research, vol.
Auxetics are materials with a negative Poisson's ratio.
Auxetic behavior in microporous polymers was first observed in a particular form of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) [18, 19].
Auxetic materials are known to exhibit various enhanced physical characteristics over their conventional counterparts [10].
Auxetic materials have a negative Poisson's ratio, meaning that under tensile stress, the area perpendicular to the tensile axis increases rather than decreases.
Development of auxetic microporous polymers began with the examination and characterization of a microporous form of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) [6, 7].
Synthetic auxetic materials [1] were first fabricated in 1987, when Lakes produced an open-celled foam that possessed a negative Poisson's ratio, [nu] [2].
In recent years, much research into the production of auxetic (i.e., possessing a negative Poisson's ratio, (v)) thermoplastics has been carried out following the discovery of an auxetic microporous form of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) [1, 2] and latterly the production of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) [3, 4] and polypropylene (PP) [5].
The first microporous polymer to be identified was a particular form of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), which was found to be auxetic solely because of its complex microstructure.
Structures of this kind are called "auxetic" honeycombs.
Alternatively, given that most materials (except those ones with auxetic core) have Poisson's ratio values ranging between 0 and 0.5, one may carry out a parametrical study considering an upper bound of interphase Poisson's and then substitute it on (35) in order to solve it for [r.sub.cr].