aversive behavior


Also found in: Medical.

aversive behavior

[ə′vərs·iv bi′hāv·yər]
(psychology)
Avoidance behavior.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, the TRs may relay information to a specific part of the brain that elicits innately aversive behavior in animals.
In other words, it appears that the children of more depressed mothers displaced their aversive behavior onto another family member.
In addition, teachers can be negatively reinforced by placing a student in timeout, because once the misbehaving student is removed from the classroom, the aversive behavior is also removed, providing them with a period of calm.
Compulsively thinking about an insolvable problem is aversive; stimuli from Jack can acquire a reinforcing function by being correlated with the termination of such aversive behavior.
This program at the Richmond State School, Richmond, Texas has been highly successful for several years in reducing the practitioner's reliance on such aversive behavior management techniques as physical restraint, sedation or general anesthesia.
If parents submit to the aversive behavior from their adolescent it negatively reinforces the adolescent to act in aversive ways in future monitoring interactions.
Researchers such as Gelles (1973) have suggested that, child physical abuse, in conjunction with an environment of high aversive behavior and low positive behavior, often occurs in the context of discipline.
For example, initial contact with a partner who has had an affair (or contact with thoughts about the affair) is experienced as totally aversive and elicits some form of aversive behavior (withdrawal, avoidance, or attack).
In ICT, one technique for promoting acceptance involves uncovering the "understandable reasons" for a partner's aversive behavior.