aversive behavior


Also found in: Medical.

aversive behavior

[ə′vərs·iv bi′hāv·yər]
(psychology)
Avoidance behavior.
References in periodicals archive ?
Remarkably, this inherited aversive behavior lasted for four generations, but in the fifth generation the worms were once again attracted to Pseudomonas.
Necromones are a class of chemicals released from dead or injured animals that elicit risk aversive behavior (e.g.
Teachers often take a characteristic approach to labeling students when dealing with aversive behavior and attribute the behavior to non-function-related variables (i.e., child's personality, need for attention, lack of family stability, parents' level of education, and so on; Bibou-Nakou et ah, 1999, 2000; Mavropoulou & Padeliadu, 2002; Christenson, Ysseldyke, Wang, & Algozzine, 1983) rather than looking at the behavior in terms of function.
In fact, the TRs may relay information to a specific part of the brain that elicits innately aversive behavior in animals.
Church (Ed.), Punishment and aversive behavior (pp.
In other words, it appears that the children of more depressed mothers displaced their aversive behavior onto another family member.
369), Jill may report "feeling like a new person" or having "a new self" because personally aversive behavior such as muscle tension and pain have diminished or disappeared (also see, Maslow, 1970, p.
217 here on power of response to others' aversive behavior; Anita Vangelisti, "Messages that Hurt," in: The Dark Side of Interpersonal Communications, ed.
This program at the Richmond State School, Richmond, Texas has been highly successful for several years in reducing the practitioner's reliance on such aversive behavior management techniques as physical restraint, sedation or general anesthesia.
Similarly, Campbell and Church (1969) referred to "aversive behavior," not to the subjective reactions to noxious stimuli.
The two categories reflected degree of maternal asynchrony in reactions to her child's positive and aversive behavior. In both cases, mothers' reactions were considered as appropriate or inappropriate based on our judgments about matching or mismatching valences (see, for details, Wahler & Dumas, 1986; Cerezo & Dolz, 2000).