avidya


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Avidyā

cause of suffering through desire. [Hindu Phil.: Parrinder, 36]
See: Evil

avidya

ignorance as cause of suffering through desire. [Hindu Phil.: Parrinder, 36]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Here, this last entity is also called the "incense/dye and avidya" ([phrase omitted]), or in "pure and impure/inflicted/entangling states ([phrase omitted]) of the four tainted-and-learning process" ([phrase omitted], see Qiuxiang Net, 2017), as a peculiar predecessor of Zhu Xi's model of "unity and many dimensions of Li" ([phrase omitted]).
Fragment 7 states that reality (tattva), which is pure (suddha), cannot be the cause of the phenomenal display (prapanca) because then this phenomenal display could never disappear, its cause being ever present, so that only maya can be responsible for it; yet fragments 3 and 4 insist that ignorance (avidya) is not a positive entity or a real thing (vastu)--if it were, reality would not be one, as something would exist besides the brahman.
In Classical Yoga, avidya is a term utilized epistemologically for what we misunderstand or cannot see.
A yoga sutra is misquoted; avidya is said to arise out of the other kleshas rather than the other way around.
Sankara speaks of vidya and avidya. Vidya has been translated as "wisdom" and avidya has most often been seen as "ignorance." Wisdom in this sense is the absence or opposite of ignorance.
According to Hinduism, the existential problem at the heart of the human condition is ignorance of the true nature of reality (avidya) that leaves us living in a world of illusion (maya).
In the Garuda Purana of Krshna YajurYeda it is stated: "Thus does the Jiva (Atma) within the (mother's womb) contemplate again and again the many kinds of miseries (it had undergone), and remembering always the miseries of the cycle of re-births, becomes disgusted (with the material enjoyments of the world), often fainting in the inmost centre (viz., heart) of all creatures at (the idea of) his avidya, desire, and karma.
In Buddhist psychology, not recognizing this dilemma is referred to as the fundamental ignorance (avidya) underlying all confusion and anxiety.
Other possible subsidiaries of (B) might conceivably be values that could refer to, build on, or (for Buddhist-soteriological purposes) even supersede, but not constitutively contradict, that founding value: "According to Dharmakirti and his successors, the contradictoriness between ignorance (avidya) and knowledge (vidya) lies in the fact that the two cognitions display contrary akaras of the alambana" (Eltschinger 259, n.
Dark skinned Dasyus are only forces of Avidya or darkness, not a racial metaphor," Frawley added.
The problem is located within the deeper psychic and structurally systemic recesses of a white North American nightmare that is grounded in ignorance or what Johnson refers to as avidya. In short, then, for Johnson, through the conceptual and spiritual lens of Buddhism, whites have failed to engage in genuinely robust forms of encountering Black bodies; they have failed or refused to engage in forms of relationality that are humanizing.