personality disorder

(redirected from Avoidant personality disorder)
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Related to Avoidant personality disorder: Schizoid personality disorder, Dependent personality disorder

personality disorder

[‚pərs·ən′al·əd·ē dis‚ȯrd·ər]
(psychology)
Any of various disorders characterized by abnormal behavior rather than by neurotic, psychotic, or mental disturbances.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, a person with avoidant personality disorder may be a very good housekeeper and be a dependable member of her church, where she feels comfortable.
With the exception of borderline personality disorder (and to a lesser degree, avoidant personality disorder), there has been very little research concerning the efficacy of manualized treatments for personality disorders, especially compared to the extensive treatment literature for Axis I disorders.
(2006) examined the efficacy of Beck's cognitive therapy for personality disorders (Beck, Freeman, & Davis, 2004) in 30 individuals with avoidant personality disorder or obsessive-compulsive personality disorder.
This rationale has been applied to the treatment of avoidant personality disorder specifically in several empirical studies.
The Development and Maintenance of Avoidant Personality Disorder
The defining feature of avoidant personality disorder (AVPD) is a pervasive pattern of avoidant and inhibited behavior in response to social situations in which the possibility of negative evaluation is present (DSM-IV-TR).
Possible behavioral reasons for this rigidity are provided in subsequent sections of this paper on the maintenance of personality-disordered behavior, especially borderline and avoidant personality disorders.
Consider how various thematic false beliefs pervade several axis II disorders, such as paranoid, schizotypal, borderline, narcissistic, or avoidant personality disorders. They all have an enduring component of a fixed false belief that falls on the continuum of psychosis.
Dysthymia is also more common among families that have a history of borderline or avoidant personality disorders, according to Daniel Klein, Ph.D., a professor of clinical psychology at Stony Brook University.
Schizotypal, schizoid, paranoid, and avoidant personality disorders. In P.
For example, reliance on strangers for care poses a risk for exacerbating paranoid, schizoid, schizotypal, and avoidant personality disorders. Loss of attractiveness is a problem for people with histrionic, narcissistic, or borderline personality disorders.
Avoidant personality disorders are significantly more common in unipolar patients than bipolar patients, said Dr.