awn


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awn

any of the bristles growing from the spikelets of certain grasses, including cereals

awn

[ȯn]
(botany)
Any of the bristles at the ends of glumes or bracts on the spikelets of oats, barley, and some wheat and grasses. Also known as beard.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grass awns sicken or kill hundreds of hunting dogs across North America annually.
Awn picks and buys her gems online from Brazil, India and the U.
But ripgut grass, cheatgrass, and red brome also produce penetrating seed awns.
21) was observed in GD102 x GD189 for awn length and minimum awn length was observed in GD170 x GD189 (6.
Government sources said Awn al-Khaswaneh, the deputy chief of the International Court of Justice, was the strongest candidate to replace al-Bakhit.
Rieh Awn is the host and creator of Green Air Media, a syndicated news radio feature for environmentally significant news that is distributed by CBS to 450 news radio affiliates nationally.
The signing of the MoU was attended by Yemen Education Minister Abdul-Salam al-Jawfi, Executive Director of Al Awn Foundation Adel Ba-Homid and WLAR Chief Executive Officer Reem Bsaiso.
The AWN represents 110 publications with a collective readership of 17 million adults.
Among the residents living nearby was 43-year-old Robina Awn, who said she spent the night attempting to calm her 15-year-old daughter.
The windows were designed 150 years ago by AWN Pugin, most famous for his interiors in the Houses of Parliament, and made by William Wailes in his Bath Lane premises for the church's opening in 1844.
Seed dormancy was associated with the presence of an awn, and black hull or red pericarp/testa colorations in two weedy strain-derived [F.
If David Watkin is offended by seeing his name misprinted here, he could take consolation from the fact that AWN Pugin appears as 'NAW'; that Colen Campbell is 'Colin'; that Dominikus Bohm is 'Bohm'; that Sackler (of the Royal Academy galleries) is 'Secklar'; that Landseer's Trafalgar Square lions are attributed to Lutyens; that Liverpool's Anglican cathedral is referred to as a nineteenth-century building; that Saarinen's TWA terminal at JFK is captioned as 'New York Airport'; and that the Louisiana Museum for Modern Art is called on one occasion the 'Danish National Louisiana Gallery' and on another the 'Louisiana Danish National Gallery'.