artery

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Related to axillary artery: axillary vein, brachial artery, subclavian artery

artery

artery, blood vessel that conveys blood away from the heart. Except for the pulmonary artery, which carries deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs, arteries carry oxygenated blood from the heart to the tissues. The largest arterial trunk is the aorta, branches of which divide and subdivide into ever-smaller tubes, or arterioles, until they terminate as minute capillaries, the latter connecting with the veins (see circulatory system). Other important arteries are the subclavian and brachial arteries of the shoulder and arm, the carotid arteries that lead to the head, the coronary arteries that nourish the heart itself, and the iliac and femoral arteries of the abdomen and lower extremities. The walls of the large arteries have three layers: a tough elastic outer coat, a layer of muscular tissue, and a smooth, thin inner coat. Arterial walls expand and contract with each heartbeat, pumping blood throughout the body. The pulsating movement of blood, or pulse, may be felt where the large arteries lie near the body surface.
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artery

[′ärd·ə·rē]
(anatomy)
A vascular tube that carries blood away from the heart.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

artery

any of the tubular thick-walled muscular vessels that convey oxygenated blood from the heart to various parts of the body
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
For the axillary images, the positions of the median, ulnar and radial nerves were analysed using a quadrant template arranged around the axillary artery (6).
Both of them were formed by three lateral roots and one medial root anterior to the 3rd part of the axillary artery. One of them had its proximal two lateral roots crossing the 2nd part of the axillary artery to join the medial root just medial to the second part of the axillary artery.
Variations in the branching pattern of Axillary artery noted by previous workers are: In a report by Ravindra s.
It was reported that in domestic birds, the axillary artery was an independent branch of the subclavian artery and not as in mammals, the continuation of that vessel (Nickel et al.).
During a routine educational dissection, a rare branching pattern of right axillary artery was found in a 74-year-old Korean female cadaver.
The left shoulder dissection is shown such that it is possible to identify the trocar (T), axillary artery (A), the deltoid branch of the thoracoacromial artery (R), and the coracoid process (C).
It was observed that in the right upper limb, the lateral thoracic artery, thoraco-dorsal, circumflex scapular and posterior circumflex scapular artery arises from a common trunk from the second part of axillary artery underneath the pectoralis minor muscle (picture 1).
In subclavian and axillary artery variations, is important to consider the stage 16 of development (8-11 mm; 37 d).
Of arteries that arise in the arm the name accessory brachial artery can be given if the artery originates from the brachial or axillary artery and rejoins the brachial artery in the distal third of the arm before it divides into the usual forearm arteries.
The blood supply of the proximal humerus is provided mainly by the circumflex humeral arteries, which branch off the axillary artery. The ascending branch running through the area of the bicipital groove is significant as it also flows through a substantial part of the calvaria.
The axillary artery, a continuation of the subclavian artery, begins at the outer border of the first rib, and ends normally at the inferior border of teres major muscle where onwards it continues as the brachial artery.
(4) Post-stenotic dilatation leads to aneurysmal changes, which begin in the distal subclavian artery and extend into the proximal axillary artery. This leads to intimal damage and thrombus formation which may become dislodged and embolise distally.