axiomatic

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axiomatic

, axiomatical
(of a logical system) consisting of a set of axioms from which theorems are derived by transformation rules
References in periodicals archive ?
Axiomatically the culprit was the very liberal coalition or 'establishment', with which Clinton could not have been more closely aligned if she had tried.
The crucial assumption that inaction axiomatically leads to loss of prestige, should be examined more forcefully by both policymakers and the citizens electing them to office.
He explains how innovations in information technology did not axiomatically produce a more equitable distribution of knowledge, social status, or political power.
On the other hand, Boos's argument can easily seem self-validating or simply axiomatically true: from Buber to Adorno, it is clear that all the "speakers" treated here have challenged Germans to awaken to the genocide and to the postwar remnants of Nazism still present in society.
Axiomatically, when the tide of sentiment turns, margin calls - a requirement that the investor immediately deliver more cash to cover possible losses - accelerate the total market plunge.
The NTHE people, on the other hand, seem to mistake strong probability for inevitability, and hold to the idea of assured extinction as axiomatically as the mainstream holds to the idea of a sustainable business as usual.
The coordinates, X, T are the ones measured in the postulated preferred frame [SIGMA] in which the speed of light is axiomatically isotropic.
This set is structured axiomatically and the boundary points of this set construct the empirical production function that is a piecewise linear function.
Axiomatically, treatment 7 was the most appropriate for red pumpkin beetle management.
Axiomatically, to study the so-called "downtown" East European community required then--as it does today--a facility with Yiddish and, to a lesser extent, Hebrew, to read the immigrants' newspapers, to examine synagogue minute books, and to understand rabbinic religious disputes, etc.
Another reason was that the Calgary staff, and especially the curator in charge of the Nickle showing, me, firmly believed that many visitors need help in decoding difficult works of art, but that such help does not axiomatically take away from that piece, that the formalist system of "no comment", that used for the Voice of Fire, is not helpful.
Their energy has to do with the special symbolic status of the Constitution, the way that Americans identify with almost axiomatically, so that (A) if the Constitution says it, it must be right; and (B) if it's right, the Constitution must say it.