axis


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Axis,

coalition of countries headed by Germany, Italy, and Japan, 1936–45 (see World War IIWorld War II,
1939–45, worldwide conflict involving every major power in the world. The two sides were generally known as the Allies and the Axis. Causes and Outbreak
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). The expression "Rome-Berlin axis" originated in Oct., 1936, with an accord reached by HitlerHitler, Adolf
, 1889–1945, founder and leader of National Socialism (Nazism), and German dictator, b. Braunau in Upper Austria. Early Life

The son of Alois Hitler (1837–1903), an Austrian customs official, Adolf Hitler dropped out of high school, and
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 and MussoliniMussolini, Benito
, 1883–1945, Italian dictator and leader of the Fascist movement. Early Career

His father, an ardent Socialist, was a blacksmith; his mother was a teacher.
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. The Axis was solidified by an Italo-German alliance in May, 1939. This was extended (Sept., 1940) by a military alliance among Germany, Italy, and Japan—the so-called Berlin Pact, to which Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Slovakia, and Croatia adhered later. The related Anti-Comintern Pact (see CominternComintern
[acronym for Communist International], name given to the Third International, founded at Moscow in 1919. Vladimir Ilyich Lenin feared a resurgence of the Second, or Socialist, International under non-Communist leadership.
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), originally concluded between Germany and Japan in 1936, later had as adherents, besides the Berlin Pact nations, Spain, Denmark, Finland, and the puppet governments of Manchukuo and Nanjing.

axis

1. An imaginary line that usually passes through the center of a body or system and about which the body is often symmetrical or has some form of symmetry. It is the imaginary line about which a rotating body turns or about which an object, such as the celestial sphere, appears to rotate.
2. A reference line on a graph.

Axis

An imaginary straight line, about which parts of a building, or group of buildings, can be arranged or measured.

axis

[′ak·səs]
(anatomy)
The second cervical vertebra in higher vertebrates; the first vertebra of amphibians.
The center line of an organism, organ, or other body part.
(geology)
A line where a folded bed has maximum curvature.
The central portion of a mountain chain.
(graphic arts)
The locus of intersection of two pencils of lines in perspective position.
(mathematics)
In a coordinate system, the line determining one of the coordinates, obtained by setting all other coordinates to zero.
A line of symmetry for a geometric figure.
For a cone whose base has a center, a line passing through this center and the vertex of the cone.
(mechanics)
A line about which a body rotates.

axis

A straight line indicating center of symmetry of a solid or plane figure.

Axis

in World War II, the affiance of Germany, Italy, Japan, etc., opposing the Allies. [Eur. Hist.: Collier’s, VIII, 457]

axis

1
1. a real or imaginary line about which a body, such as an aircraft, can rotate or about which an object, form, composition, or geometrical construction is symmetrical
2. one of two or three reference lines used in coordinate geometry to locate a point in a plane or in space
3. Anatomy the second cervical vertebra
4. Botany the main central part of a plant, typically consisting of the stem and root, from which secondary branches and other parts develop
5. an alliance between a number of states to coordinate their foreign policy
6. Optics the line of symmetry of an optical system, such as the line passing through the centre of a lens
7. Geology an imaginary line along the crest of an anticline or the trough of a syncline
8. Crystallog one of three lines passing through the centre of a crystal and used to characterize its symmetry

axis

2
any of several S Asian deer of the genus Axis, esp A. axis. They typically have a reddish-brown white-spotted coat and slender antlers
References in classic literature ?
In the same way, the angle formed by the rope with the vertical axis of the machine, indicates the velocity.
The steel rod connecting the spring with the propeller was suddenly jerked out of place, at the car end, (by a swaying of the car through some movement of one of the two seamen we had taken up,) and in an instant hung dangling out of reach, from the pivot of the axis of the screw.
This center, formed of indefinite molecules, began to revolve around its own axis during its gradual condensation; then, following the immutable laws of mechanics, in proportion as its bulk diminished by condensation, its rotary motion became accelerated, and these two effects continuing, the result was the formation of one principal star, the center of the nebulous mass.
In fact, he would have perceived this sun, as yet in the gaseous state, and composed of moving molecules, revolving round its axis in order to accomplish its work of concentration.
This body revolved upon its axis, and exhibited the phenomena of all celestial bodies abandoned in space.
Possibly, these several differences may be connected with some difference in the flow of nutriment towards the central and external flowers: we know, at least, that in irregular flowers, those nearest to the axis are oftenest subject to peloria, and become regular.
The animal an instant before bursting expanded to half again its natural size; and the explosion took place about fifteen seconds after the rapid progressive motion had ceased: in a few cases it was preceded for a short interval by a rotatory movement on the longer axis.
And suppose the objector to refine still further, and to draw the nice distinction that not only parts of tops, but whole tops, when they spin round with their pegs fixed on the spot, are at rest and in motion at the same time (and he may say the same of anything which revolves in the same spot), his objection would not be admitted by us, because in such cases things are not at rest and in motion in the same parts of themselves; we should rather say that they have both an axis and a circumference, and that the axis stands still, for there is no deviation from the perpendicular; and that the circumference goes round.
They who made England, Italy, or Greece venerable in the imagination did so by sticking fast where they were, like an axis of the earth.
A basket I could not make by any means, having no such things as twigs that would bend to make wicker-ware - at least, none yet found out; and as to a wheelbarrow, I fancied I could make all but the wheel; but that I had no notion of; neither did I know how to go about it; besides, I had no possible way to make the iron gudgeons for the spindle or axis of the wheel to run in; so I gave it over, and so, for carrying away the earth which I dug out of the cave, I made me a thing like a hod which the labourers carry mortar in when they serve the bricklayers.
In what had once been a drawing-room, there were a pair of meagre mirrors, with dismal processions of black figures carrying black garlands, walking round the frames; but even these were short of heads and legs, and one undertaker-like Cupid had swung round on its own axis and got upside down, and another had fallen off altogether.
And this,' cried Sampson, clasping his hands, 'is the world that turns upon its own axis, and has Lunar influences, and revolutions round Heavenly Bodies, and various games of that sort