axoplasm


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Related to axoplasm: axon, Axoplasmic flow

axoplasm

[′ak·sə‚plaz·əm]
(neuroscience)
The protoplasm of an axon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vacuoles comprising myelin figures were detected in axoplasms.
1.5-h postketamine injection, a significant degeneration was observed in the spinal nerve roots, myelinated nerve fibers, lamellae, axoplasm, Schwann cell cytoplasm, and nucleus, in some regions, condensation was observed in the axoplasm.
(ii) the axoplasm in a fibre can be modelled as a fluid where a pressure wave is generated due to an electrical signal; here, for example, the actin filaments in the axoplasm may influence the opening of channels in the surrounding biomembrane but do not influence the generation of a pressure wave in the fluid [40,42,44];
Movement of organelles along filaments dissociated from the axoplasm of the squid giant axon.
We analyzed the tissue 4 days after injury because at that time fibers with intact axoplasm would exist with others that had already begun the WD process.
The pressure prevents axoplasm in the optic nerve from flowing freely.
At the microscopic level, they have been identified in the cytoplasm and dendrites [17] but not within the axoplasm [2].
The neuromuscular junction showed degeneration of intramuscular nerve fibers, reduction in the axon caliber, swollen mitochondrial, increase in the actin filaments and microtubules in the axoplasm, and swelling of the Schwann cells.
One can understand these results in terms of TYR displacing NE from vesicular stores into the axoplasm, where the NE would undergo oxidative deamination to an aldehyde intermediate, followed by reduction of the aldehyde to DHPG (1,11,12).
Bodian and Howe (1941b) determined the transport velocity of the virus in the axoplasm to reach mitral cell dendrites within 1 hr after intranasal instillation.
The virus multiplies in the muscle and connective tissue but can remain localized anywhere from days to several months; it then progresses along the axoplasm of peripheral nerves to ganglia and eventually multiplies, ultimately producing severe and fatal encephalitis.
Thus, upon stimulation, a substantial amount of [Na.sup.+] moves down its electrochemical potential gradient from the external medium into the axoplasm. This inward current causes a shift in the membrane potential toward the [Na.sup.+] equilibrium potential (i.e., depolarization).