azimuth error

azimuth error

[′az·ə·məth ‚er·ər]
(astronomy)
The angle by which the east-west axis of a transit telescope deviates from being perpendicular to the plane of the meridian.
(engineering)
An error in the indicated azimuth of a target detected by radar.

azimuth error

As it pertains to radar, the bearing error due to horizontal refraction.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the present study, given that the perspective compression effect occurs entirely within the elevation dimension, it is tempting to compare the effect of elevation error across GFOVs with the azimuth error across GFOVs found by McGreevy and Ellis.
Watching the north or south drift of a star on the meridian reveals any azimuth error.
Dependent measures included azimuth error, elevation error, and the percentage of trials resulting in a front-back confusion.
Azimuth error was determined by taking the absolute value of the difference between the source azimuth and the response azimuth and correcting the resultant for front-back confusions.
Post hoc Bonferroni-adjusted paired t-tests indicated that within each elevation band, azimuth error was higher in both of the HPD conditions than it was in the unoccluded condition (p [less than] .
Therefore it is predicted that greater magnitudes of azimuth error will result for the smaller and negative EPEAs used in the current study.
The mean azimuth error for the perspective display was 7.
Using a -15 [degrees] EPEA, azimuth judgments were more accurate when target images were above the reference cube (mean azimuth error = 10.
The remaining 32 769 target/entry pairings were analyzed on the basis of azimuth error (angular deviation of the entry from the target), range error (Linear distance of the entry from the center point, or ownship position, as compared with the linear distance of the target from the center point), and total distance error (absolute linear distance from the entry to the target).
A MANOVA was conducted to test for effects of number of targets, range zone, and azimuth zone distributions, and participant on each of the six dependent variables in the target replacement task (number of errors of omission, errors of commission, large errors, mean azimuth error, mean range error, and mean distance error) and the three dependent variables in the decision task (number of reported actions, number of targets attacked, and report of an exit) using the 4885 groups of target set data collected across the 10 participants.
Average azimuth error of participant entries was significantly related to the azimuth zone density pattern of the target set, F(6, 4854) = 45.
Because the technique cannot interrogate the donor radar directly, range and azimuth errors should be expected.