azoic dye

azoic dye

[a′zō·ik ′dī]
(organic chemistry)
A water-insoluble azo dye that is formed by coupling of the components on a fiber. Also known as ice color; ingrain color.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Chrysoidine, a type of industrial azoic dye, is a kind of illegal additive banned in China [2, 6, 7] which could cause acute and chronic toxicity to mammals administrated by oral or skin route or inhaled [8] and has been confirmed to be genotoxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic [9-11].
Most important acid dyes are sulfonic acid derivatives of azoic dyes [1].
Lobato et al., "Electrochemical oxidation of azoic dyes with conductive-diamond anodes," Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research, vol.
Synthetic or poisoning dyes engaged more often on industrial scale are acid dyes, water soluble anionic, basic dyes-water soluble cationic, substantive dyes-alkaline, vat dyes-water soluble alkali metal salt, azoic dyes, sulfur dyes, and chrome dyes.
The Ministry of Environment and Forests is imposing a ban on the manufacture in India of the 190 prohibited dyes, including 84 direct dyes, 30 acid dyes, 16 disperse dyes, 11 basic dyes, 11 azoic dyes and 38 pigments.
Most important are sulfonic acid derivatives of azoic dyes. The practical uses of these dyes are characterized by their capacity to dye protein and polyamide fibers.