azotemia


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azotemia

[‚az·ə′tem·ē·ə]
(medicine)
The presence of excessive amounts of nitrogenous compounds in the blood.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The blood urea nitrogen shows progressive azotemia at the end of the 4 weeks.
IHD treatment for humans with CKD is intended to reduce azotemia, correct fluid and electrolyte imbalances, and give support to CKD patients in stage V before kidney transplantation.
From this evidence we could then explain the associationbetween proteinuria and increased TB and DB by a complex mechanism that involves not only the direct toxic effect of bilirubin on tubular cells [7, 45], but also the effects of prerenal azotemia which in many cases can lead to the development of ischemic damage often described as acute tubular necrosis [36].
Laboratory tests showed severe azotemia (BUN 21.4 mmol/L, Cr 1,370 [micro]mol/L) compared to baselines labs 1 month earlier (Cr 124 [micro]mol/L).
However, a protein intake which accounts for more than 16% of calories could contribute to azotemia and negative water balance if associated fluid intakes are low.
A rise in the BUN level reflects the disease status of initial intravascular volume depletion and prerenal azotemia in AP [2].
renale, dos quais 57,14% apresentaram azotemia. Levando-se em consideracao a compensacao renal do orgao nao afetado, somada as causas de aumento da concentracao de ureia sanguinea nao relacionadas necessariamente a um aumento na concentracao de creatinina como mencionadas por Bush (2004), no presente relato, nao se verificou a ocorrencia de insuficiencia renal em funcao do parasitismo.
Biochemical investigations were significant for azotemia, hyponatremia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia.
Sixty-nine dogs with CKD were diagnosed based on their history, the presence of azotemia and isosthenuria, and were grouped according to classification proposed by the International Renal Interest Society (IRIS).
Our patient had a mild clinical picture of glomerulonephritis and did not develop oliguria, hypertension and azotemia. The signs regressed rapidly with early and efficient treatment of infection.
Clinical examination, associated with suspicion for renovascular hypertension (the absence of reduced high blood pressure values after quadruple antihypertensive therapy; the occurrence or evolution of azotemia in a hypertensive patient treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; the onset of arterial hypertension after the age of 50; multiple atherosclerotic locations, in different arterial areas) and vascular ultrasound can lead to the diagnosis, for a significant percentage of patients.