babesiosis


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Related to babesiosis: ehrlichiosis, leishmaniasis, Q fever

babesiosis

(bəbē'bēō`sĭs), tick-borne disease caused by a protozoanprotozoan
, informal term for the unicellular heterotrophs of the kingdom Protista. Protozoans comprise a large, diverse assortment of microscopic or near-microscopic organisms that live as single cells or in simple colonies and that show no differentiation into tissues.
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 of the genus Babesia. Babesiosis most commonly affects domestic and wild animals and can be a serious problem in cattle, but since the mid-20th cent. the disease has also been found in humans. In most cases the protozoal species is specific to a single host. The organisms enter the blood via a tick bite, then infect the red blood cells where they reproduce by cell division.

Human babesiosis, sometimes called Nantucket fever, was first diagnosed in healthy individuals after an outbreak on Nantucket Island, off the coast of Massachusetts, in the 1970s. The causative organisms are related to those that causes malariamalaria,
infectious parasitic disease that can be either acute or chronic and is frequently recurrent. Malaria is common in Africa, Central and South America, the Mediterranean countries, Asia, and many of the Pacific islands.
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, and are transmitted by the deer tick that also hosts the organisms that cause Lyme diseaseLyme disease
or Lyme borreliosis,
a nonfatal bacterial infection that causes symptoms ranging from fever and headache to a painful swelling of the joints. The first American case of Lyme's characteristic rash was documented in 1970 and the disease was first identified
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 and human erhlichiosisehrlichiosis
, any of several diseases caused by rickettsia of the genus Ehrlichia. Ehrlichiosis is transmitted by ticks. Both human forms tend to develop about nine days after a tick bite.
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. The main symptoms are fever and chills, but especially in persons who have a compromised immune system or have had a splenectomy babesiosis can be more severe and sometimes fatal. Treatment is with a combination of antimalarial drugs.

References in periodicals archive ?
About 1,000 new cases of babesiosis are reported each year, while Lyme disease infects about 30,000 people annually.
Babesiosis or tick fever, is a febrile disease of domestic and wild animals characterized by extensive erythrocytic lysis leading to anaemia, icterus and haemoglobinuria.
Tambien ha sido utilizada durante decadas para el tratamiento contra tripanosomosis y babesiosis (5).
The deer tick, which also spreads Lyme disease, is the most common vector for the babesiosis parasite, Babesia microti.
In recent years, nine fatal cases of transfusion-transmitted babesiosis have been reported.
such as Lyme disease, human babesiosis, human anaplasmosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, human ehrlichiosis, tick-borne relapsing fever, Powassan encephalitis, and Colorado tick fever.
Diseases spread by ticks include anaplasmosis, Lyme borreliosis, babesiosis and ehrlichiosis, many of which can cause serious diseases in humans.
However, an incidental review of thin and thick smears showed intraerythrocytic ring-shaped trophozoites characteristic of babesiosis (Fig.
He however said that the baseline for the number of transmittable diseases was 250, which include Anthrax, Babesiosis, Balantidiasis, Brucellosis, Cholera, Cowpox, Dengue fever, Congo and others.
Babesia is a tick-borne parasite of red blood cells, and the number of cases of babesiosis being transmitted through blood transfusion has been increasing since 1979, according to a study published online Sept.
Transfusion-associated cases of babesiosis have been increasingly recognized since 1979, the year the first known case occurred.
The tick carries an anemia-causing parasite that preys on cattle blood cells and spreads bovine babesiosis, which causes fever, paralysis and often leads to death if left untreated.