maenad

(redirected from bacchants)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to bacchants: maenadic

maenad

, menad
Classical myth a woman participant in the orgiastic rites of Dionysus; bacchante
References in periodicals archive ?
After all, when Bacchants escape from Pentheus's prison and roam the hills, they suckle and nurture but mostly rend and kill.
17), or be struck by the castanets, flute, and singing of represented bacchants (Philostratus, Imag.
His blinding was recounted in The Baths of Pallas, a poem by Callimachus; in Euripides ' Bacchants, he is a convert to Dionysian rites.
251-64) And in another part [of the tapestry] youthful Bacchus was wandering with the band of Satyrs and the Nysa-born Sileni, seeking you, Ariadne, and fired with your love; then the swift bacchants here and there were raging with frenzied mind, euhoe, crying tumultuously, euhoe, shaking their heads.
and did so on the wooded slopes of Mount Cithaeron, where she and her fellow Bacchants roamed with and like animals [.
At one of Gabbitt's poetry readings, the nitwit women circle him like Bacchants, repeating his words until they collapse in ecstasy.
Euripides ' play The Bacchants tells the story of Dionysus ' gory triumph over Pentheus, king of Thebes.
Yet, these women were Bacchants, that is, Dionysian orgiasts, and in other versions Dionysus himself directs them to kill Orpheus because the bard, in his devotion to Apollo the sun-god, has prevented the wine-god's acceptance in Thrace.
Patricia Monaghan cites several explanations for the wildness of the Bacchants, ranging from possession, insanity and criminality, to a theory of the repressed anger of oppressed Greek women that "erupted in occasional furious orgies," to another belief that the Dionysian religion was "an essentially female form of spirituality, a chance for women to enact the divine and horrible roles of goddesses" (187).
Orpheus fails on the very threshold of the world of the living, Eurydice returns to Hades forever, and Orpheus is left to his fate: death at the hands of the Bacchants, the female worshipers of Dionysus.
In the immediate context of the narrative, too, Diomedes sees the story of Lycurgus as having an obvious relevance to himself, as he shows by setting his own refusal to fight against [Mathematical Expression Omitted] (129) against Lycurgus' willingness to do this very thing [Mathematical Expression Omitted] in the same sedes two lines later (the myth is set out in ~ring' form, with the variant [Mathematical Expression Omitted] in the repeated refusal in 141 (14) And Diomedes further shows his understanding of the relevance of the story to his present position on the battlefield by relating the conflict between Lycurgus and the Bacchants in the familiar war-language of the Iliad itself.
In the version in the Brussels Musee des Beaux Arts, Silenus is one slide of fluster and ivresse, with a glowing spill of flesh, a drench of toppled wine and a slope of silver hair, caught up in a dithyrambic whirl accentuated by a maenad's tambourine; thronged around by Bacchants who struggle to support his bulk, their double chins slipping agog into their obesity as the maenad dodges a faun's smacking kiss.