Bacchus

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Bacchus

(băk`əs), in Roman religion and mythology, god of wine; in Greek mythology, DionysusDionysus
, in Greek religion and mythology, god of fertility and wine. Legends concerning him are profuse and contradictory. However, he was one of the most important gods of the Greeks and was associated with various religious cults. He was probably in origin a Thracian deity.
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. Dionysus was also the god of tillage and law giving. He was worshiped at Delphi and at the spring festival, the Great Dionysia. In Rome, the mysteries of his cult were closely guarded, and he was identified with an ancient god of wine, Liber Pater. Many legends connected with Dionysus were also used in the cult of Bacchus.
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A seventeenth-century engraving of a drunken Bacchus supported by two fauns. Reproduced by permission of Fortean Picture Library.

Bacchus

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Bacchus is asteroid 2,063 (the 2,063rd asteroid to be discovered, on April 24, 1977). It is approximately 1.2 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 1.1 years. Bacchus was named after the god of wine, the Roman equivalent of the Greek Dionysus. According to Martha Lang-Wescott, Bacchus is related to addictive syndrome, particularly to the denial, substitution, and management of uncomfortable emotions. This asteroid’s key word is “denial.” According to J. Lee Lehman, “Bacchus represents the way that a person seeks ecstasy through direct experience or passion.” Jacob Schwartz gives the astrological significance of this asteroid as “Ecstasy to encourage sensual excess and fertility; addictive personalities and behaviors and attempts to manage feelings through substitutions.”

Bacchus is also one of the names given to the hypothetical planet that some astrologers assert is orbiting beyond Pluto.

Sources:

Lehman, J. Lee. The Ultimate Asteroid Book. West Chester, PA: Whitford, 1988.
Lang-Wescott, Martha. Asteroids-Mechanics: Ephemerides II. Rev. ed. Conway, MA: Treehouse Mountain, 1990.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Bacchus

god of this season. [Rom. Myth.: Hall, 130]
See: Autumn

Bacchus

(Gk. Dionysus) god of wine; honored by Bacchanalias. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 83]

Bacchus

god of wine. [Rom. Myth.: Hall, 37, 142]
See: Wine

Bacchus

(in ancient Greece and Rome) a god of wine and giver of ecstasy, identified with Dionysus
References in periodicals archive ?
(8) Allison Hersh discusses how interesting to feminist playwrights the excesses and transgressions of the Bacchic rites have been.
The Bacchic Man is a punch in the stomach and a punch on the nose--it is so powerful.'
(24) After the Macedonian army entered the neighboring region of Carmania (modern southeastern Iran) in a Bacchic procession, Alexander returned to Pura, the capital of Gedrosia, where he held choral contests to entertain his soldiers.
Under the rim, a frieze of fruiting vines bears witness to their function, and Bacchic symbols on the body including delicate sprays of ivy, thyrsi, tambourines and reed pipes celebrate the joys of wine.
Although the death of the infant Linus takes place in Argos, the manner of that death--dismemberment--forges an important link with Thebes, notorious for the death of Pentheus, torn apart by his mother and his aunt in a state of Bacchic frenzy (Ovid, Met.
The finest is a pair of large jasper vases, quarried in the Urals, cut in the imperial lapidary workshops, lavished with ormolu mounts of Bacchic masks and scrolling anthemion, and topped with finials of grapes.
Such a reading is supported by an examination of the Bacchic ritual element prominent in both poems.
(23) Although Reni's picture has more figures, the inclusion of Venus in his Bacchus and Ariadne changes the feeling of the scene, from that of a frenzied Bacchic procession to the more formal and stately air of the wedding seen in Tiutoretto's painting.
Dance, drums, and music, so central to Dionysian activity, were powerful means of entrancing, of exciting a Bacchic frenzy, an irresistible human flood (14.338-85).
(61) On this interpretation of the Nymphaeum as a sort of 'Bacchic cave', see A.
We find the poet as witch rather than as vates, the poet as self-mocking social climber, the Athenian citizen as bacchic or "hysteric." Needless to say, the performances are all by men, though adapting male-defined "female" identity is an option in men's self-fashioning.
He was said to sway excessively as he performed, as though in a Bacchic frenzy; when one of Polemo's students compared him to a drum-musician, Scopelian claimed that his oratorical rhythm was the martial beat of the shield of Ajax (VS 519-520).