back


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms.

Back,

river, c.600 mi (970 km) long, rising in lakes, Northwest Territories, Canada, and flowing northeast through Nunavut across the tundra to Chantry Inlet. Numerous lakes lie along its course. It is named for Sir George BackBack, Sir George,
1796–1878, British explorer in N Canada. He accompanied Sir John Franklin on arctic expeditions in 1818, 1819–22, and 1824–27. On an expedition (1833–35) to search for the missing John Ross, Back explored the Great Fish River (now Back
..... Click the link for more information.
, the first European to descend the river (1834).

What does it mean when you dream about the back?

Because of the dreaming mind’s tendency to literalize metaphors, the back can signify meanings from familiar sayings. For example, in a dream the back may mean “watch your back” (beware of treachery).

back

[bak]
(anatomy)
The part of the human body extending from the neck to the base of the spine.
(graphic arts)
The part of a book where the binding and pages are stitched together.
(mining engineering)
The upper part of any mining cavity.
A joint, usually a strike joint, perpendicular to the direction of working.

back

1. The rear, reverse, unseen, more remote, or less important part of a structure, tool, or object
2. The support for a more prominent or visible element; e.g., the back of wallboard is the surface to be plastered.
3. The top or exposed side of a slate, tile, or the like, in contrast to the bed.
4. The ridge or top of a horizontal member or structure like a joist, rafter, or roof.
5. A principal rafter.
6. The extrados or top surface of an arch, often buried in the surrounding masonry.
7. A low-grade veneer used for the back ply in plywood construction.
8. The wainscoting below the sash frame of a window, extending to the floor.

back

back
backclick for a larger image
backclick for a larger image
i. The curved surface of a propeller blade. It corresponds to the upper surface of the airplane's wing. Also called a blade back.
ii. The back of the power curve, where any decrease in speed results in a disproportional increase in drag. A stage may be reached when even with full power the aircraft may continue to sink. Also referred to as behind the power curve and backside of the power curve.
iii. The top part or the upper surface area of an airplane, especially of an airplane's fuselage, referred to in such contexts as “to fly on its back.”
iv. The back seat (rear cockpit) of a two-seater combat or trainer aircraft.
v. The changing of wind direction in the anti-clock-wise direction. When the wind direction changes in the anticlock-wise direction, it is called backing when the change is clock-wise, it is called veering.

back

1
1. Ball games
a. a mainly defensive player behind a forward
b. the position of such a player
2. the upper surface of a joist, rafter, slate, tile, etc., when in position

back

2
a large tub or vat, esp one used by brewers
References in classic literature ?
Such a town as that has to be always moving back, and back, and back, because the river's always gnawing at it.
He crouched alongside of him, right arm drawn back and ready for a smashing blow the instant Joe should start to rise.
So it was agreed that they would make a forced march back through the jungle to where they had been deserted by Jacinto.
He walked back a few steps towards the middle of the room, and stood still again.
She answered seriously: "I thought maybe you couldn't come back for me.
Alleyne, staggering to the side, was about to hurl himself after him, but Hordle John dragged him back by the girdle.
But he looked across a million years, at two mad creatures who had slipped the leach of the generations and who were back in the darkness of spawning life ere dawning intelligence had modified the chemistry of such life to softness of consideration.
I know that since I have so humbly done thy bidding thou wilt carry me back again.
At daybreak they limped warily back to camp, to find the marauders gone and the two men in bad tempers.
He reached for me with his long arm, and his nails tore my flesh as I leaped back from the clutch and gained the comparative safety of the side-wall.
He staggered back in surprise, too dumbfounded even to cry out, and then I clubbed his rifle and felled him with a single mighty blow.
Soon he was up again, and away,--not far into the country, but back towards London by the high-road--then back again--then over another part of the same ground as he already traversed--then wandering up and down in fields, and lying on ditches' brinks to rest, and starting up to make for some other spot, and do the same, and ramble on again.