back lobe

back lobe

[′bak ‚lōb]
(electromagnetism)
The three-dimensional portion of the radiation pattern of a directional antenna that is directed away from the intended direction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Back lobe is a lobe the degree between its axis and main lobe radiance is approximately 180 degree.
Despite owning many advantages, the LWA still faces a major problem which is the trade-off between the back lobe and the length of the LWA.
However, a little back lobe radiation has been noticed at 4.0 GHz.
From the E plane graph, directional radiation patterns with small back lobe can be observed (Figure 21(a)).
6 shows the measured radiation pattern, it is found that there is a discrepancy between the simulated and measured one in the back lobe area.
Compared with Ref 2, the beam is narrower, but the back lobe is larger.
The antenna elements can be arrayed in any desired configuration for specific pattern shaping, including tilting side lobe and back lobe limits and reconfigurable coverage.
The back lobe is in the opposite direction from the main beam, and the side lobes are at other angles.
In antenna patterns, the radiation is often characterized by three kinds of lobes, i.e., main lobe, side lobe and back lobe. See Fig.
As clearly shown in Figure 13, they are similar in shape with one main lobe and one back lobe. The results indicate the back lobes of all antennas can be considered very small.
Without taking these errors into account, a good correlation still exists between the patterns, even in the back lobe region.
More importantly, however, it has a small magnitude in a wide region surrounding [[theta].sub.backlobe] = -90[degrees] by virtue of the matching of the back lobe widths discussed above.