backbencher


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backbencher

Brit, Austral, NZ a Member of Parliament who does not hold office in the government or opposition
References in periodicals archive ?
Senior backbenchers want Miliband, who quit politics to run a charity in the US, back here as quickly as possible.
While the backbenchers are keenly aware that the proposed law changes are opposed by a powerful coalition of ethnic and religious groups, the issue has united leaders from Australia's indigenous, Chinese, Jewish, Armenian, Arab, Korean, Greek, Vietnamese and Sikh communities, all of them calling for the Abbott government's exposure draft to be scrapped, the report adds.
Around 70 Conservative backbenchers have signed a tweaked amendment to the immigration legislation, originally tabled by Nigel Mills MP, which calls on the Government to reinstate restrictions on migrants from Romania and Bulgaria working in Britain until the end of 2018.
Tory backbenchers fear that the Mills amendment will not be called after Theresa May tabled 50 amendments, some of a highly technical nature, to the immigration bill for debate on Thursday.
The other evolution in Parliament was the changing relationship between backbenchers and leaders.
Other backbenchers echoed his call for the Speaker to go.
is for Ginger Crinkle biscuits: 67p, claimed by a Labour backbencher in 2007.
And Wansbeck Labour backbencher Denis Murphy employs partner Grace Boyle as his senior researcher and Parliamentary assistant and his daughter Deborah Scott as a part-time junior secretary.
DAVID Cameron was last night under pressure from Tory backbenchers to defy his Liberal Democrat coalition partners and press ahead with the abolition of the controversial Human Rights Act.
He said: "I hope we can reflect on how we can allow and encourage backbenchers to play a bigger and a more influential role in holding government and parliament to account.
Senior Labour backbencher Sir Stuart Bell said there was "a sense of grievance" at the way the rules had been changed against the principles of "natural justice".
Senior Labour backbencher Barry Sheerman said Labour needed to get its "act together" and stop blaming its difficulties on the MPs' expenses scandal.