backlash


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backlash

1. a reaction or recoil between interacting worn or badly fitting parts in a mechanism
2. the play between parts

backlash

[′bak‚lash]
(design engineering)
The amount by which the tooth space of a gear exceeds the tooth thickness of the mating gear along the pitch circles.
(electronics)
A small reverse current in a rectifier tube caused by the motion of positive ions produced in the gas by the impact of thermoelectrons.
(engineering)
Relative motion of mechanical parts caused by looseness.
The difference between the actual values of a quantity when a dial controlling this quantity is brought to a given position by a clockwise rotation and when it is brought to the same position by a counterclockwise rotation.
References in periodicals archive ?
sure our government and security forces are prepared to meet any backlash," he
The book is laid out in three parts, beginning with an overview of recent policy and debate, followed by extended discussions of what she calls the "first Welfare Backlash (1945-1979)" which reached the national level by the 1960s, and finally the "contemporary welfare backlash (1980-2004).
It's telling that there hasn't been a big backlash against liberal reformers in Estonia, the country that has gone furthest in the transition from communism to free markets.
He shows that academic discourse on multiculturalism is sharply divided, and that the neoconservative position has, over the years, become ascendant to reinforce the white backlash.
But it was interesting to get a little bit of backlash.
Straight ball tracks have the least resistance to plunge efforts, but greatly increase backlash through the driveline.
With some companies readjusting their offshoring strategies, Ryla positioned itself to take advantage of a growing offshoring backlash and has reaped the benefits.
CONNECTIONS of Backlash, the horse at the centre of the amended result controversy at Wolverhampton on Saturday, have decided not to appeal against the decision.
Theodore Dwight Bozeman, The precisianist strain: disciplinary religion and Antinomian backlash in Puritanism to 1638, 2004, $82.
This paper comments on Arthur Powell's plenary paper "The Diversity Backlash and the Mathematical Agency of Students of Color".
Big, as Frank tells it, beginning with the cultural backlash of the 1960s, conservative leaders learned to appropriate traditional populist language (people v.