backspring

backspring

[′bak‚spriŋ]
(naval architecture)
A heavy line extending forward at an acute angle with a ship from the stern or midships to a wharf.
References in periodicals archive ?
We will never be the backspring of any empire, "he said, referring to recent statements by the US president.
75 inches fully open--doesn't have the ubiquitous backspring found on typical slipjoints, instead incorporating a fin on the spine of the folder's Titanium frame.
He did away with the external release tab and hid it within the frame, ditched the backspring and replaced it with a blade stop, and added an internal ball bearing detent on the blade tang to keep the blade closed inside the handle.
The open blade isn't actually locked in position, but instead is held in place by a strong backspring that pushes the blade toward the open or closed position.
irreversible hydrolysis, the condensation reaction, polymerization, is prevented because of the elastic backspring of the chain parts;
This double backspring, in which painting and sculpture pass each other on the way to becoming each other, makes a very comical narrative: the sculptural painter now may contemplate himself as a painterly sculptor, as in a mirror.
We just called them "pocketknives"--simple non-locking folding knives you just threw in your pocket with loose change, and when you wanted to close the blade you simply pushed it forward from the backside, overcoming the backspring and returning it to the handle.