backstay

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backstay

[′bak‚stā]
(engineering)
A supporting cable that prevents a more or less vertical object from falling forward.
A spring used to keep together the cutting edges of purchase shears.
A rod that runs from either end of a carriage's rear axle to the reach.
A leather strip that covers and strengthens a shoe's back seam.
(graphic arts)
A rope or strap that keeps the carriage of a hand printing press from moving too far forward.
(naval architecture)
A rope, wire, or cable that runs from the top of a mast to the side of a ship and slants a little aft.
(textiles)
A bar having a glass rod on its top that runs across a loom beneath the lowest motion of the warp yarns.
References in periodicals archive ?
Twin steering wheels are located forward in the cockpit and behind are the mainsail trimmers and obligatory running backstay crew.
The sail plan is held aloft by a swept-back spreader rig with adjustable backstay and spars can be aluminium or carbon with Park Lane boom.
Ambush2 has a carbon Hall Spars NZ mast (alloy boom) held up by Nitronic rod standing rigging, with twin top Dynex top mast backstay. A North Sails wardrobe is bent on with assymetrics flying off a fixed bowsprit.
Keel stepped carbon masts from Southern Spars are used and supported by hydraulic backstays plus powered winches can be fitted.
Underway, the Swan 80RS's carbon rig can support an extensive sail plan thanks to twin backstays, outboard shrouds and lead T-keel.
The backstay uses pulley adjustment and the overall deck looks very clean with conventional inboard jib tracks and a wide main track just ahead of the steerer --so ideal for short-handed sailing.
The alloy rig looks well supported with twin backstays and outboard shrouds.
The alloy rig is supported by outboard chain plates and an adjustable (pulley) backstay plus hard vang.
Firefly is rigged with a four spreader Hall Spars carbon mast and boom, supported by PBO shrouds and twin running backstays. Three sets of powered, alloy Harken winches run the sail plan from North Sails along with Lewmar deck gear.
B&G electronics and push-button hydraulic controls are logically arranged and close at hand, whilst the main sheet traveller and hydraulic Harken 990's for the running backstays are located aft of the helm positions.
A rig was designed to be self-supporting with no backstay in up to 18 knots.