bacon


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Related to bacon: Francis Bacon

bacon,

flesh of hogs—especially from the sides, belly, or back—that has been preserved by being salted or pickled and then dried with or without wood smoke. Traditionally, the process consisted of soaking the pork in brine or rubbing it in a salt mixture by hand, then smoking the sides in smoke from an open chimney. It sometimes took three or four months. Bacon is still home cured in some rural communities, but the bulk of its manufacture is carried on in large industrial meatpacking plants equipped to slaughter, dress, cure, smoke, and sell on a large scale. Bacon refers to different cuts in different countries. In the United States it usually means the side between the fifth rib and the hipbone. In Europe, the word bacon generally refers to one half of a fattened pig. Bacon has one of the highest fat contents of any cut of meat.

Bacon

1. Francis, Baron Verulam, Viscount St. Albans. 1561--1626, English philosopher, statesman, and essayist; described the inductive method of reasoning: his works include Essays (1625), The Advancement of Learning (1605), and Novum Organum (1620)
2. Francis. 1909--92, British painter, born in Dublin, noted for his distorted, richly coloured human figures, dogs, and carcasses
3. Roger. ?1214--92, English Franciscan monk, scholar, and scientist: stressed the importance of experiment, demonstrated that air is required for combustion, and first used lenses to correct vision. His Opus Majus (1266) is a compendium of all the sciences of his age

bacn

Pronounced "bacon," it is a newsletter, product offering or some other message sent via email that a user previously agreed to accept but rarely has the time to read. Bacn is not spam. See opt-in.
References in classic literature ?
At first Bacon did what he could for his friend, and it was through his help that Essex was set free.
It was then that Bacon had to choose between friend and Queen.
Among the learned counsel sat Bacon, a disappointed man of forty.
As the trial went on, however, Bacon spoke, not to save, but to condemn.
Perhaps Bacon could not have saved his friend from death, but had he used his wit to try at least to save instead of helping to condemn, he would have kept his own name from a dark blot.
To Bacon it seemed too small a reward for his betrayal of his friend, even although it had seemed to mean loyalty to his Queen.
Bacon's splendid mind and unique intellectual vision produced, perhaps inevitably, considering his public activity, only fragmentary concrete achievements.
They deal with a great variety of topics, whatever Bacon happened to be interested in, from friendship to the arrangement of a house, and in their condensation they are more like bare synopses than complete discussions.
With characteristic intellectual independence Bacon strikes out for himself an extremely terse and clear manner of expression, doubtless influenced by such Latin authors as Tacitus, which stands in marked contrast to the formless diffuseness or artificial elaborateness of most Elizabethan and Jacobean prose.
But Bacon's most important work, as we have already implied, was not in the field of pure literature but in the general advancement of knowledge, particularly knowledge of natural science; and of this great service we must speak briefly.
(The Great Renewal of Knowledge); but parts of this survey were necessarily to be left for posterity to formulate, and of the rest Bacon actually composed only a fraction.
In the details of all his scholarly work Bacon's knowledge and point of view were inevitably imperfect.