bacon

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bacon,

flesh of hogs—especially from the sides, belly, or back—that has been preserved by being salted or pickled and then dried with or without wood smoke. Traditionally, the process consisted of soaking the pork in brine or rubbing it in a salt mixture by hand, then smoking the sides in smoke from an open chimney. It sometimes took three or four months. Bacon is still home cured in some rural communities, but the bulk of its manufacture is carried on in large industrial meatpacking plants equipped to slaughter, dress, cure, smoke, and sell on a large scale. Bacon refers to different cuts in different countries. In the United States it usually means the side between the fifth rib and the hipbone. In Europe, the word bacon generally refers to one half of a fattened pig. Bacon has one of the highest fat contents of any cut of meat.

Bacon

1. Francis, Baron Verulam, Viscount St. Albans. 1561--1626, English philosopher, statesman, and essayist; described the inductive method of reasoning: his works include Essays (1625), The Advancement of Learning (1605), and Novum Organum (1620)
2. Francis. 1909--92, British painter, born in Dublin, noted for his distorted, richly coloured human figures, dogs, and carcasses
3. Roger. ?1214--92, English Franciscan monk, scholar, and scientist: stressed the importance of experiment, demonstrated that air is required for combustion, and first used lenses to correct vision. His Opus Majus (1266) is a compendium of all the sciences of his age
References in classic literature ?
Yet it may be that Bacon only strove to be great so that he might have more power and freedom to be pitiful.
It was, alas, that bounty of the hand that Bacon begged for and stooped for all through his life.
When the dark hours came and Essex fell into disgrace, it was Bacon who forgot his friendship.
At first Bacon did what he could for his friend, and it was through his help that Essex was set free.
Having offended Queen Elizabeth by his boldness in successfully opposing an encroachment on the rights of the House of Commons, Bacon connected himself with the Earl of Essex and received from him many favors; but when Essex attempted a treasonable insurrection in 1601, Bacon, as one of the Queen's lawyers, displayed against him a subservient zeal which on theoretical grounds of patriotism might appear praiseworthy, but which in view of his personal obligations was grossly indecent.
They deal with a great variety of topics, whatever Bacon happened to be interested in, from friendship to the arrangement of a house, and in their condensation they are more like bare synopses than complete discussions.
With characteristic intellectual independence Bacon strikes out for himself an extremely terse and clear manner of expression, doubtless influenced by such Latin authors as Tacitus, which stands in marked contrast to the formless diffuseness or artificial elaborateness of most Elizabethan and Jacobean prose.
They tried to argue it away by reminding conscience that they had purloined sweetmeats and apples scores of times; but conscience was not to be appeased by such thin plausibilities; it seemed to them, in the end, that there was no getting around the stubborn fact that taking sweetmeats was only "hooking," while taking bacon and hams and such valuables was plain simple stealing -- and there was a command against that in the Bible.
Then I see that you eat my tourteau in preference, whilst I, in preference, eat your bacon.
His poppy-colored cheeks were distended with his first big bite of bread and bacon, but he managed to smile encouragingly.
Warmed-over flapjacks, warmed-over beans, fried bacon, and coffee composed the breakfast.
Danglars threw himself upon his goat-skin, and Peppino, reclosing the door, again began eating his pease and bacon.