DNA

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DNA:

see nucleic acidnucleic acid,
any of a group of organic substances found in the chromosomes of living cells and viruses that play a central role in the storage and replication of hereditary information and in the expression of this information through protein synthesis.
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DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid)

See GENETICS.

DNA

(biochemistry)

DNA

deoxyribonucleic acid; a nucleic acid that is the main constituent of the chromosomes of all organisms (except some viruses). The DNA molecule consists of two polynucleotide chains in the form of a double helix, containing phosphate and the sugar deoxyribose and linked by hydrogen bonds between the complementary bases adenine and thymine or cytosine and guanine. DNA is self-replicating, plays a central role in protein synthesis, and is responsible for the transmission of hereditary characteristics from parents to offspring

DNA

(1) See Windows DNA and DNA storage.

(2) (Digital Network Architecture) Introduced in 1978, the DNA was Digital's umbrella term for its enterprise network architecture based on DECnet. See Digital Equipment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yokobori et al., "Tanpopo cosmic dust collector: silica aerogel production and bacterial dna contamination analysis," Biological Sciences in Space, vol.
Persistence and biological activity in soil of insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis and of bacterial DNA bound on clays and humic acids.
Direct detection of bacterial DNA from the blood by PCR is an effective adjunct to blood culture for the diagnosis of NS.
We analyzed the reads for bacterial DNA by using 3 metagenomics tools: Kraken (1), PathoScope (2), and One Codex (https://www.onecodex.com).
When sex chromosomes among' common pill bugs go bad from disuse, borrowed bacterial DNA comes to the rescue.
Many of methods based on bacterial DNA have been reported for the detection and characterization of VTEC.
Genetic pressure has maintained enough conservation in this sequence to allow for the design of PCR primer sets which can be very nearly "pan-species," so that a single PCR reaction can confirm or deny the presence of bacterial DNA in our extracted sample.
* More sophisticated approaches involve extracting bacterial DNA from field samples and sequencing the DNA in the laboratory.
Scientists compared the bacterial DNA from those villagers with samples from U.S.
For PCR analysis, two primers (DG74 and 143SA) corresponding to a region within the 16S ribosomal RNA gene were used to amplify gram positive bacterial DNA (7).
By sequencing the ancient bacterial DNA, researchers are hoping to understand how the plague has evolved and spread over the centuries.