bacterial enzyme


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bacterial enzyme

[bak′tir·ē·əl ′en‚zīm]
(microbiology)
Any of the metabolic catalysts produced by bacteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even though the human and bacterial enzymes perform the exact same chemical reaction, the bacterial one looks just a little different.
The gastrointestinal microbiota composition is influenced by bile salts and in turn, bile salts themselves are chemically modified in the gut by bacterial enzymes such as bacterial bile salt hydrolase (BSH).
The amended agreement provides an option for GSK to expand its rights around the bacterial enzyme target LeuRS in return for a milestone payment ranging from $5.5 million to $6.5 million, depending upon the timing of such payment.
This may make the bacterial enzyme a preferable catalyst system for gene therapy (Kievit et al., 1999).
A study based on inhibiting a key component in the biosynthesis of an essential bacterial enzyme used to create nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, or NAD, is an example of a new pursuit.
The drug is "the first in a new class of antibiotics called macrocycles, which inhibit the bacterial enzyme RNA polymerase, resulting in the death of C.
Dimericine is a form of the bacterial enzyme T4 endonuclease.
According to an item in the journal Science, the research team says it has manipulated a bacterial enzyme called vanadium nitrogenase that usually produces ammonia from nitrogen gas.
The team has found that a bacterial enzyme called chondroitinase can digest molecules within scar tissue to allow some nerve fibres to regrow It also promotes nerve plasticity, which means that any remaining undamaged nerve fibres have an increased likelihood of making new connections to bypass the area of damage.
No evidence exists to correlate oxygen sensitivity with bacterial enzyme production and pathogenicity in aerotolerant clostridia.
In the current study, published in the April issue of Nature Biotechnology, Alex Harvey, PhD of Athens, GA-based AviGenics, Inc and colleagues reported that the chickens produce a biologically active version of a bacterial enzyme. While this kind of genetic tinkering has been used to produce human proteins in the milk of mice, rabbit, pigs, sheep, goats, and dairy cows, the egg method offers several advantages, the investigators said.
Using engineered viruses as gene carriers, Harvey and his colleagues at the University of Georgia in Athens inserted the DNA blueprint for a bacterial enzyme called beta-lactamase into embryos of white leghorn chickens.