plaque

(redirected from bacterial plaque)
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Related to bacterial plaque: subgingival plaque

plaque

1. Pathol any small abnormal patch on or within the body, such as the typical lesion of psoriasis
2. short for dental plaque

Plaque

A tablet, often inscribed, added to or set into a surface on the exterior or interior wall.

plaque

[plak]
(medicine)
A patch, or an abnormal flat area on any internal or external body surface.
A localized area of atherosclerosis.
(virology)
A clear area representing a colony of viruses on a plate culture formed by lysis of the host cell.

plaque

A tablet that is affixed to the surface of a wall or set into a wall; often inscribed to commemorate a special event or to serve as a memorial.
References in periodicals archive ?
They were taught how to perform bacterial plaque control with CPI and they were standardized on this instrument.
2% in children of a primary school in the city of Nova Aurora, Parana State, during the 2007 school year, by means of disclosing bacterial plaque, correlating it to the protocol and the efficacy of the mouth rinse application.
116), whereas the proportions were found to be different between boys and girls for the following oral conditions: bacterial plaque, gingivitis, dental caries, malocclusion, developmental anomalies and restorations.
Our Ca-binding kinetics results are consistent with those by Tatevossian, (28) who studied the kinetics of Ca binding in a pool of bacterial plaque using Ca ion-selective electrodes in vitro; this study showed that the binding was rapid and almost reached saturation within 10 min.
This material was introduced into the oral cavity, producing a red color wherever there was bacterial plaque.
4) It is caused by the bacterial plaque, or biofilm, which forms on the teeth and underneath the gums.
GROUP 1: with old bacterial plaque (without previous tooth brashing) and GROUP 2: with recent bacterial plaque (with previous tooth brushing).
It can also be the result of build-up of bacterial plaque and over-zealous brushing.
Smokers are much more likely than non-smokers to have bacterial plaque and tartar form on their teeth, have deeper pockets between the teeth and gums and lose more of the bone and tissue that support the teeth.
The company points out that dental professionals recommend that their patients brush at a 45-degree angle so that the bristles reach the bacterial plaque that thrives below gum lines.
Often linked with gum disease, it's usually due to nothing more serious than a build up of bacterial plaque in the mouth, although less common reasons include lack of saliva, nose problems, sinusitis or a long-term lung infection.

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