bagnio


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bagnio

1. A bathing establishment.
2. A brothel.
3. A Turkish prison.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bagnio in broken English admonishing me to "Sit still" on the
Celebrated characters such as the radical John Wilkes, courtesans Kitty Fisher and Mrs Abington, the magistrate Sir John Fielding and rake Colonel Francis Charteris shine in his descriptions and he gives gripping accounts of the mysterious kidnapping of Elizabeth Canning and the unsolved murder of Ann Bell, left brutalised by her client in a bagnio.
At the end of day three, Amaryllis finds herself in a bagnio through the cunning and guile of Philander.
This Turkish bagnio perhaps simulates the Habermasian sphere of the development of communicative freedom.
Exasperated, the father concluded his letter: "I am apprehensive that the Playhouse has done nothing but prepare my boy for the highway, and my girls for a bagnio."(28)
Cervantes's personal experiences as a captive for five years in a royal bagnio (prison) in Algiers inform the geographical, cultural, and social milieu of the plays.
It is quite true that antagonism between individuals occasionally becomes exacerbated; that in the course of action or intrigue, Moors and Christians call each other dogs and scoundrels; that the buffoon in The Bagnios of Algiers, the sacristan Tristan, is free with insults for the Moorish children who make fun of him and with jibes directed at the Jew whom he amuses himself by tormenting.
While Fuchs's primary critical focus has been less on dramatic than on narrative genres--although, with Aaron Ilika, she has given us the gift of new translations of two of Cervantes' neglected plays, The Bagnios of Algiers and The Great Sultana--she has often commented perceptively on English Renaissance theater.
The Bagnios of Algiers and the Great Sultana-Two Plays of Captivity.
Having lived in Algiers, Morgan would have seen returning corsairs with their booty and hapless captives, drudging along the streets to the bagnios of slavery.
Cruickshank's own specialist knowledge provides descriptions of the bagnios and of the speculative buildings where ill-gotten gains could be had.