bakeapple


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bakeapple

Canadian the fruit of the cloudberry
References in periodicals archive ?
In nearby Forteau, the Bakeapple Festival in August celebrates the golden-coloured berries, also called cloudberries, which grow in abundance along the coast.
In 1994 Omohundro observed that bakeapple pickers in Labrador could earn several thousand dollars in a season.
The bakeapple and the partridgeberry are more often employed in a symbolic fashion, however.
Survey respondent Don Raymond wrote, "The bakeapple products were a revelation
English settlers who came afterward heard this as bakeapple, claims the tale.
The lichen-and moss-covered cliffs were as soft as pillows underfoot, and to our surprise, we found blue flag irises, ivory mushrooms, bakeapple blossoms and Labrador tea plants growing like weeds (2002).
Knudsen said, "People were looking to buy partridgeberry and bakeapple jam--we looked for a suitable product but couldn't find one" (Newfoundland 2002).
Bill decided to try some bakeapple "drinkable berries.
Max Earle brought me out a bottle of bakeapples and another from Mrs.
I brought some cream back to the boat with me which the two Air Force girls, the Purser, the Captain, and I consumed, with bakeapples in the Mate's cabin, which is being used by the two Air Force girls, one of whom is Vi Adams from St.
Pocius notes that blueberries were second only to bakeapples in popularity in Calvert where community members used them for wine, jams, and pies.
In late summer and early fall they gathered raspberries, marsh berries, squashberries, blueberries, and bakeapples to make jams, tarts, preserves, and wines for the winter months ahead and to provide local delicacies for tourists.