bakeapple

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Related to bakeapples: Partridge berry, cloudberries

bakeapple

Canadian the fruit of the cloudberry
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Two centuries later, readers of Annie Proulx's The Shipping News are introduced to berry picking in chapter twenty-four, straightforwardly titled "Berry Picking." Proulx writes: On the headlands and in the bogs berries ripened in billions, wild currants, gooseberries, ground hurts, cranberries, marshberries, partridgeberries, squashberries, late wild strawberries, crowberries, cloudy bakeapples stiff above maroon leaves.
The setting also provides Wavey and the aunt an opportunity to discuss the great value placed on bakeapples, as well as another Newfoundland tradition, "berry ocky."
"Agnis girl, last fall they paid ninety dollars a gallon for bakeapples. My father made a thousand dollars on his berries last year.
The berries ripen one after the other across the province as the summer winds down and autumn begins: first the wild strawberries, blackberries and currants, followed by the highly prized bakeapples, (11) then raspberries, succeeded by squashberries and blueberries, and lastly corne the partridgeberries and marshberries (Gray 1977: 9,13; Omohundro 1994: 163-167; Pocius 1991: 127-130).
She told me that when people come here in the summertime, they say, "Rita, where you live to, we're surprised to see all the different kinds of berries that you people can get here." Because I mean we can get partridgeberries, blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, squashberries, bakeapples ...
Bakeapples are amber and more expensive as they are harder to find and are a sweeter flavour.
Among visitors to the province, discussion about how bakeapples got their name [which Bill Casselman asserts is "a one-hundred percent Canadian word" (1998: 12)] is frequent, and often occurs around the supper or breakfast table at inns and B&Bs.
Bakeapples are said to be named by another linguistic misunderstanding.
He elaborated, "From bakeapples we learned how hard people work to collect them from the bogs."
Of his stay in the Labrador Straits, a web site author who identifies himself simply as "Dave," writes: Rita, our hostess, gives us bakeapples over vanilla ice cream and they are absolutely delicious.
Max Earle brought me out a bottle of bakeapples and another from Mrs.
I brought some cream back to the boat with me which the two Air Force girls, the Purser, the Captain, and I consumed, with bakeapples in the Mate's cabin, which is being used by the two Air Force girls, one of whom is Vi Adams from St.