balance spring


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balance spring

[′bal·əns ‚spriŋ]
(horology)
An oscillating spring of spiral or (in a chronometer) cylindrical shape which governs the movement of a balance wheel in a timepiece. Also known as hairspring.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The escapement, consisting of a cam-poised balance and a freely oscillating Lange balance spring, runs at a frequency of 21,600 semi-oscillations per hour.
This heart is the balance spring, the watch's regulating organ.
Powered by a high-end Swiss automatic movement with a 40-hour power reserve and featuring the latest technology, including a flat silicon balance spring, the piece features a sapphire crystal case back that showcases a rose gold openworked rotor and elegant movement finishes, such as circular Co tes de Gene ve motifs, rhodium plating, and circular graining.
Breguet transforms the simple day/night indication into an entirely new complication, using the constantly moving balance spring to represent the sun and a bas-relief carving for the moon.
The Speedmaster Mark II "Rio 2016" is powered by the OMEGA calibre 3330 equipped with an Si14 silicon balance spring and a Co-Axial escapement with three levels.
Powering this stylish timepiece is the hand-wound Omega master co-axial calibre 8511 - a unique movement which features a time zone function, Si14 silicon balance spring, a three-level co-axial escapement and Omega's exclusive anti-magnetic technology.
The tourbillon carriage has been crafted from titanium, and in the movement used, the calibre 581DR, the balance spring is made of silicon, unlike traditional ones in metal alloys.
Nestled within the hand-wound mechanical movement is a flying tourbillon that comprises a balance spring, anchor and escapement wheel made of silicon.
The watch is equipped with OMEGA's innovative Si14 silicon balance spring and the industry- changing OMEGA Co-Axial calibre 8501, visible through a sapphire crystal caseback.
The horologist, John Harrison (1693-1776), did indeed develop the bi-metal balance spring and although he received several payments for his efforts, he did not win the official pounds 20,000 prize.
It is a movement with real staying power, which has retained its virtues, but has also been enhanced with a few of the stylistic elements of the early Jones calibres: balance with high precision adjustment cams on the balance bars, Breguet balance spring, three-quarter wheel train bridge, plate and bridge made of nickel silver, long precision adjustment index and special decoration with gilt engraving.
The invention of the balance spring in the 1670s was to transform the British watch making industry.