ballistic efficiency

ballistic efficiency

[bə′lis·tik i′fish·ən·sē]
(mechanics)
The ability of a projectile to overcome the resistance of the air; depends chiefly on the weight, diameter, and shape of the projectile.
The external efficiency of a rocket or other jet engine of a missile.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you need reduced-recoil handloads, do it with 140-grain bullets to improve ballistic efficiency and fit chamber throats.
Because of the high density, relatively short lead or lead-alloy bullets offer excellent ballistic efficiency. Such bullets give good accuracy and terminal performance in low-velocity loads.
While ballistic efficiency is hard to dismiss as irrelevant, it's also hard to love.
Overall, bonded designs provide a significant performance advantage over conventional non-bonded lead-core bullets and are available in a wide variety of styles from exposed-lead nose to polymer tipped designs for improved long-range ballistic efficiency. There are probably more types of bonded bullets on the market today than any other.
The short powder column and sharp 35-degree shoulder angle contribute to the WSM's ballistic efficiency and accuracy.
The neck of the 5.56mm NATO case was increased sufficiently to accept a 6.5mm bullet, while case length was shortened slightly to 42mm, just enough to accept projectiles of higher ballistic efficiency than the original length would allow.
They placed their emphasis on: A) superior accuracy, B) downrange ballistic efficiency for retained energy and a flat trajectory, C) positive controlled expansion on target, and D) a lasting finish that retains a fresh visual appearance even after long storage.
"Increasing diameter, weight and ballistic efficiency beyond what is possible from the .22 centerfires brings us to 6mm and up, with a maximum bullet weight of around 130 grains.
To achieve a flat trajectory, and thereby improve long range capability, requires a higher degree of ballistic efficiency than can be provided by the 6x45mm.
Yet another was great ballistic efficiency. In the early '70's I first became aware of a new Hornady bullet, the 7mm 162-grain BTHP.
This probably made sense commercially--the 6-inch satisfied those who wanted (almost) maximum ballistic efficiency and a superior sight radius; the 4-inch remained for those who wanted something a bit more "packable." But the 5-inch--a wonderful compromise--seemed to have an extra magnitude of coolness, particularly in S&W's Model 27 and Colt's Official Police.
This significantly increases ballistic efficiency without reducing accuracy potential.
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