ballistic transport


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ballistic transport

[bə′lis·tik ′tranz‚pȯrt]
(electronics)
The passage of electrons through a semiconductor whose length is less than the mean free path of electrons in the semiconductor, so that most of the electrons pass through the semiconductor without scattering.
References in periodicals archive ?
* Then transport and bias are set by choosing ballistic transport using Green's function approach.
* However, steps 2 to 5 was repeated with ballistic transport using semi-classical approach and lastly with drift diffusion transport.
The distribution of electron density was almost the same for ballistic transport using Green's function and semi-classical approach, whereas the drift diffusion model has more electron on the channel region due to scattering mechanism.
The plot of 2D electron density of sub-bands along channel at 2.5nm Si film thickness shows that the distribution of electron density was almost the same for ballistic transport using Green's function and semi-classical approach while drift diffusion transport has more electron on the channel region and is more than that of 1.5nm.
It has been observed that in nanowire based MOSFET the ballistic transport has taken place for high values of electric field while quasi ballistic transport has occurred at low electric fields.
Basic diagram of a flow diagram of the fuel node includes crushing, screening, separating air, ballistic transport of waste conveyor belts between devices, magnetic separation on conveyor belts, composting or bio-drying in closed reactors.
Graphene--a monolayer of sp2 bonded carbon atoms in a honeycomb lattice--is of considerable interest because of its high current density, ballistic transport, chemical inertness, high thermal conductivity, optical transmittance, and super hydrophobia at the nanometer scale.
q = [LAMBDA][DELTA]T (Kn >> 1, ballistic transport).
HIGHER-ORDER FLUXES, CONTINUED-FRACTION EXPANSIONS, AND BALLISTIC TRANSPORT
* Electron beam lithography of quantum dots and quantum devices, with applications such as quantum ballistic transport at very low temperatures and high magnetic fields, as well as the quantum-classical transition, and the role of quantum effects in real devices at room temperature.